ARCHIVES: Plane crashed into Friskney house and teenager saves his niece’s life

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This photo shows a festive celebration party at Tower Road Primary School in Boston in 1983.

The snap was uploaded to the Facebook group ‘Boston Memories - Lincolnshire’ by Christine Brown and shows her son Darryl Brown in the middle looking at the camera.

1945: A plane involved in an air battle with the enemy caught on fire near Lincoln ended up crashed into a house in Friskney, killing a mother and daughter.

The crew of the plane had parachuted out after putting it into automatic pilot mode and turning its nose towards the sea.

However, the plane came down on to the Yawlingate house killing a 50-year-old mother and her 15-year-old daughter. The husband was found badly burnt in the garden of the home shortly after the tragedy, and later died at hospital a few days later.

l A Boston woman had a lucky escape when a wall from her house collapsed into her garden.

Luckily for Mrs C. Banks, and her three daughters, who were all in bed at the time, the bricks fell outwards away from the rooms of her Norfolk Place home.

Mrs Banks told The Standard that it seemed as though ‘a bomb’ had fallen very close to the house as every room shook violently.

The wall had previously been damaged by a bomb blast during the raid which caused extensive damage in Main Ridge and Silver Street. In addition, the kitchen ceiling was destroyed and windows broken. Since then, the bricks and mortar had been coming loose.

1985: A teenage special constable became the family hero after his cool presence of mind saved his young niece’s life.

Toddler Melanie Green fell into the next door neighbour’s pond in Peck Avenue, Boston, trying to reach her doll and had stopped breathing by the time she was pulled out.

But her uncle Robert Green, 19, knew exactly what to do - and his kiss-of-life brought her back from the brink of death.

Robert’s dad Frank said: “He kept his cool while everybody else was panicking.”

l Pensioner Arthur Cook, who escaped death by a split-second as a 30-ton truck ploughed through his garden fence, called for greater road safety at the notorious blackspot. The driver of the lorry was killed when it lost control on a bend at Wrangle and ended up on its side opposite a school. But it could have been a double fatality as Mr Cook, 83, had to jump to safety when the lorry hit the spot where he had been standing.