LOOKING BACK: Skulls hung on gates and the French are liberated

The Standard announced Boston's The Gonks as the latest band on the beat scene. Pictured are group members Pete Moulder, John Scarbro and Mark Palmer. BS 1964b
The Standard announced Boston's The Gonks as the latest band on the beat scene. Pictured are group members Pete Moulder, John Scarbro and Mark Palmer. BS 1964b

This week’s nostalgia feature looks back to the years 1915 and 1945, with a photo flashback to 1964.

100 years ago... 1915

The Rev G. E. Nicholls reported the grisly find to police who took away the skulls - one of which was in a good state of preservation, with a perfect set of teeth. The other was damaged.

The discovery was a complete mystery - but it was suspected to be a rather macabre practical joke.

l Fears of a German bomb attack on Boston were heightened when the town received reports a Zeppelin had been spotted just 25 miles away.

News of the enemy aerial descent on the East Coast, at Yarmouth and Sheringham and King’s Lynn, reached Boston just before midnight.

Police woke the town mayor Mr C. Lucas at his home in Sleaford Road to ask for his advice and instructions relating to local preparations for a possible hostile attack.

The fire brigade and ambulance brigade were summoned and told to stand in readiness of an attack.

Steps were also taken to extinguish all street lights - which meant the ‘lamp-lighters’ also had to be roused from their beds. No raid came that night - but a postmaster was injured when he walked into a wall during the blackout.

70 years ago... 1945

A wounded Kirton Fen soldier being treated for shrapnel wounds at Boston General Hospital recounted his dramatic experiences of the 
war.

After serving in Norway and Iceland, Cpl Tom 
Adamson, of the Lincolnshire Regiment, was sent to France - landing in Normandy four days after D-Day.

Speaking to The Standard, he said his toughest fighting was seen at Le Havre: “We found the enemy troops to be of a rather stubborn character.”

He added ther was ‘a week’s intensive artillery and mortar shelling’.

He contiunded: “During the early hours of a September morning the infantry were given the word ‘GO’ and though it was tough fighting while it lasted, we were in complete control of the place by the following afternoon. It was an impressive and liberating sight when we liberated a city, town or village. The people would line the streets and cheer us as we passed through on to our next objective.

He said that they would be ‘praying that some day they may live in a civilised world again’.

He described how crowds threw flowers, bunches of carrots, matches and sometimes gave eggs to the soldiers as a way of thanking them.

Photo flashback... 1964

In the photo above, local band ‘The Gonks’ got into the swing of their performance in 1964.