Nostalgia: love letters stop bullet near heart and ‘who boobed over go-go dancer?’

Pupils at Donington Cowley Secondary School in 1960 heard a speech on history and tradition from the Bishop of Lincoln.

Pupils at Donington Cowley Secondary School in 1960 heard a speech on history and tradition from the Bishop of Lincoln.

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These pupils at Donington’s Thomas Cowley Secondary School in 1960 heard a speech on history and tradition from the Bishop of Lincoln.

1915: A soldier was saved from death when a bullet pierced his chest -but it was prevented from entering his heart by love letters in his breast pocket.

Pte F. A. Cooke, of the 2nd Lincolns, described the battle he faced in the trenches while on leave at home.

He described charging the trenches at Nueve Chapelle in the face of ‘terrible fire’. It was during this that he was shot in the chest just over his heart.

Some love letters kept in his pocket were said to have probably saved his life, as the bullet which went through these was stopped from going so far into the body.

Pte Cooke was wounded on March 10, 1915 - exactly a year to the date he enlisted in the Army.

l In a letter to The Standard, Boston Cpl Cyril Dyson, of the Royal Engineers, spoke of his good and bad experiences of the war and riding through Belgium on a motorbike.

He wrote: “When near the firing line we are not allowed to have a light, consequently we have to use extreme caution to avoid the numerous shell holes, some of which exceed 10ft in diameter. But perhaps the most thrilling experience is to witness an aeroplane duel.

“When away from the firing line, conditions are much better in every way. We occupy various places from a Count’s mansion down to a barn or stable. The food is excellent under the circumstances. At times we have a football match which we all heartily enjoy.”

l A soldier writing to a Mr Frith, of Donington, spoke of enduring ‘one of the biggest bombardments in history’.

Trooper R. Knighton wrote of spending 10 days and 10 nights in the trenches where he witnessed some ‘terrible sights’. “There were Jack Johnsons and shrapnel in a terrific amount,” he wrote. “Along our lines about 3,000 prisoners have been taken. We have lost a few, killed and wounded, and two officers killed. This is the most important battle in which I have been engaged.”

1975: A topless dancer who performed at the Assembly Rooms came as a complete surprise to most people there - including the council who owned the building.

One ratepayer wrote to The Standard asking: “Who was in charge of the booking of a local authority hall for this degrading spectacle?”

The topless dancer performed at the Saturday night ‘Soul Time Disco’ event.

Boston Borough Council said it was not aware the go-go dancer was part of the line -up of the event when staff took the booking.

l There were fears vandals shooting at massive voltage electricity wires could endanger lives and cause black-outs in Boston. The warning came from the Electricity Board.

Only a lucky discovery of damage to 33,000 volt overhead lines near the town’s Mount Bridge substation averted the danger. It was thought to have been caused by amatuer marksmen firing at the wire with air rifles.