NOSTALGIA: This week in 1917 and 1982

A picket line at Bostons Pilgrim Hospital, this week in 1982. The Standard carried a note on its front page that week saying news and features had been affected by some staff taking industrial action in support of health service workers pay campaign.
A picket line at Bostons Pilgrim Hospital, this week in 1982. The Standard carried a note on its front page that week saying news and features had been affected by some staff taking industrial action in support of health service workers pay campaign.
  • Boston chosen as a port of exchange for First World War prisoners
  • Falklands War skipper meets Queen as troops come home

This week in 1917 ...

I didn’t realise we were such heroes until we got back.

- It was believed that Boston had been chosen as a port of exchange for prisoners of war.

The Standard reported: “We understand that the Germans have agreed that the British port for the exchange of prisoners shall be Boston.

“They refused to recognise Hull and other well-known ports which are often the objectives of their aircraft.”

- Mr and Mrs W. C. Tomlinson, of Horncastle Road, Boston, had cause to be proud of their two soldier sons.

It had been announced that Sgt Frank Tomlinson, of the Lincolnshire Battery of the Royal Field Artillery (RFA), had been awarded the Military Medal.

This came just weeks after it was learnt his brother, Corpl Alfred Tomlinson, of the Staffordshire Battery of the RFA, had been officially congratulated for having ‘distinguished himeself by gallantry in the field’.

- There was an account from the front by Gunner H. W. Salter, of the RFA, son of Mr and Mrs W. H. Salter, of Tunnard Street, Boston.

Gunner Salter had been badly gassed in France and was writing home from Highfield Military Hospital, in Liverpool.

“It got very hot, proper mustard!” he wrote.

This week in 1982 ...

- A Sibsey skipper met The Queen as part of celebrations to mark the return of troops from the Falklands War.

Capt James A. Bailey had been in command of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Olna during the conflict.

The vessel was involved in 143 replenishments at sea, with 70 in port, involving 54 different ships.

The Olna docked at Portsmouth on September 17 in the blaze of publicity surrounding the aircraft carrier Invincible as it brought home British troops.

“I didn’t realise we were such heroes until we got back,” Capt Bailey said.

As part of the return, Capt Bailey was presented to The Queen on board the Invincible before the two ships and the destoyer Bristol came in.

- After rubbing away at the corrosion on an object found in his potato harvester, farmer and contractor David Lockey, of Waites Farm, New Leake, discovered he had gathered up a 25lb bomb from the Second World War.

As soon as he recognised the lethal ‘potato’, Mr Lockey informed the police who called in the bomb disposal squad. It would go on to be detonated on Friskney shore.

“At first we thought it was a piece of wood,” she said.