NOSTALGIA: This week in 1967 and 1992

  • Phase one approved for Pilgrim Hospital in 1967
  • Phase four goes ahead for Pilgrim Hospital in 1992
  • Rescued firefighter looks back on 1942 blaze 50 years on

This week in 1967 ...

- A tender for the building cost of the first phase of Boston’s new hospital had been approved by the Ministry of Health.

“Things were very different in those days. Now everyone in a situation like that would be wearing breathing apparatus but we only had enough for two or three men.”

It was now due to face the Sheffield Regional Hospital Board, with a recommendation for approval.

The tender of £2,260,598 came from F. Shepherd and Son Ltd, of York.

It would cover a pathology department, mortuary, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and outpatients departments, an x-ray department with five radio-diagnosis rooms, an accident and emergency department with seven short stay beds, and residential accommodation for 108 students nurses, 24 staff sisters, and 14 sisters.

The total cost of the hospital was estimated as £5.5m.

- An unidentified flying object seen over Boston was later said by the Meteorological Section at RAF Manby to be a weather recording gas-filled balloon sent up in Liverpool.

- An 18th century silver pepper pot was returned to the finder after an inquest jury at Boston decided that it was not treasure trove.

The item was unearthed during excavation by the Black Sluice Internal Drainage Board at Wyberton, found by Harry Eastick, of Boston.

This week in 1992 ...

- Work had started on the fourth and ‘final’ phase of Pilgrim Hospital, in Boston, The Standard reported.

The development would provide two new 24-bed acute wards for the elderly, a new medical and nursing school, and a new administration department.

It was estimated it would cost £2.1m and take up to three years to complete, the paper added.

- The Standard caught up with ex-firefighter Harry Oglesbee, of Hospital Lane, Boston, 50 years after he was involved in a major blaze at a Boston flour mill.

‘Unconscious man dragged from the jaws of death’ was the headline in July 1942 when the paper reported on the outbreak in the top floors of the five-storey W. W. Bedford mill, in Fydell Crescent.

Mr Oglesbee was the ‘unconscious man’ of the headline; he had received the full force an exploding chlorine gas cylinder while tackling the fire, collapsed, and was then rescued by colleagues.

Speaking this week in 1992, aged 83, he said: “Things were very different in those days. Now everyone in a situation like that would be wearing breathing apparatus but we only had enough for two or three men.”