NOSTALGIA: This week in 1967 and 1997 and a snapshot from 1963

Pictured are people taking part in a large yard clean up at St Swithins Church, in Bicker, 54 years ago.
Pictured are people taking part in a large yard clean up at St Swithins Church, in Bicker, 54 years ago.
  • Children bring home bomb in 1967
  • Town mourns death of Diana in 1997

- Benington housewife Margaret Foster was busy with her household chores when her nine-year-old son Martin came home and announced ‘Mum, we’ve got a bomb’.

I thought it was a tin can and I kicked it. I saw what it was and shouted to Martin ‘come here quick - there’s a bomb’

Martin and his 13-year-old pal David Birthwhistle, also of Benington, found the bomb while playing in a pit near their homes.

David told The Standard: “I thought it was a tin can and I kicked it. I saw what it was and shouted to Martin ‘come here quick - there’s a bomb’. We didn’t know what to do with it and Martin suggested we take it to his mum.”

The device, in the end, was taken away by police.

- A step forward had been taken in the building of Boston’s new hospital.

The condemned outbuildings and gardener’s cottage at East Skirbeck House had been demolished to make way for public utility systems.

- A colour television demonstration was the ‘star of the show’ at an open day at Lincolnshire’s own TV station.

Both the ITA (Independent Television Authority) and the BBC transmitter buildings at the base of the giant 1,265ft high mast at Belmont were open at the event.

This week in 1997 ...

The Standard devoted six pages to the tragic death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

The front page story was an account from a Boston couple who had been just 150 yards away from the scene of the fatal accident when emergency services arrived to attend to it in the early hours of August 31.

It would not be until daybreak, however, that Mark and Mandy Flack – who had been holidaying in Paris – realised the significance of the sirens they had heard as news broke of the Princess’ death.

Before leaving the city, they took flowers to where the crash had taken place.

“The amount of people there was unbelievable”, said Mandy. “But what struck me most was the number of people from different nationalities, all devastated.”

The inside pages carried numerous tributes to Diana.

The Standard also wrote Boston was set to become a ‘ghost town’ as it joined the nation in paying its last respects to Diana on the coming Saturday, the day of her funeral.

There would be no market, most shops and restaurants would be closed until 2pm, and banks and building societies would be closed all day.

Council buildings would also be closed until 2pm, it added.