Boston flood barrier project takes step forward

Boston Flood Barrier.

Boston Flood Barrier.

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Permission to go ahead with Boston’s multi-million pound flood barrier scheme has this week been requested from the Secretary of State.

The Environment Agency (EA) has asked to be granted powers to construct and operate the barrier through a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO).

If granted, it would allow the construction of a new tidal barrier with a moveable gate across the River Witham and a new building to allow operation of the barrier. It would also authorise construction of new flood defence walls on both banks of the Haven, a replacement gate across the entrance to the existing Port Wet Dock and enable the EA to carry out ancillary works, including dredging of the river.

Adam Robinson, Boston Barrier Manager for the EA, said: “The barrier will give the area one of the best standards of tidal flood defence outside of London, so we’d like as many people as possible to see the Transport and Works Act application and talk to us about anything they’re uncertain about.”

The barrier will have the ability to control water levels along The Haven in the future, but only once appropriate subsequent approvals and works have been sought and granted.

Documents are available for inspection for six weeks at Boston Borough Council offices, at the EA’s Boston Barrier Community Hub in Marsh Lane and online at http://consult.environment-agency.gov.uk/lcnnth-flood-risk/bostonbarriertwao

The £100 million Boston Barrier scheme is part of a phased approach to reduce the risk of tidal flooding to approximately 14,300 properties in Boston over the next 100 years.

Coun Peter Bedford, leader of Boston Borough Council, said: “The main objective for the Boston Barrier has always been to protect this area from flooding. That must remain the main priority. We know all too well from bitter experience that there is no quick fix after flooding. In Boston it took two full years of misery and millions of pounds for many to return to anything like normal after the 2013 flood.”