Crime map wrongly targets town terrace

Boston's Albert Terrace is a very low level crime area say Boston police - despite the national police.uk crime map listing it as the worst in the borough.
Boston's Albert Terrace is a very low level crime area say Boston police - despite the national police.uk crime map listing it as the worst in the borough.

A ‘BLIP’ in the police.uk crime map data has lead to concern from residents of a small terraced road in Boston.

Families living at the 14-home Albert Terrace, situated off Frampton Place, were dismayed to discover the website map claims their road has the highest number of crimes for any single location in the borough. But according to Boston police, the road has ‘very low levels of crime’.

Polish national Klaudia Cichawa, 29, who has lived at Albert Terrace for four years, said: “It’s worrying as there are mostly foreign families living here and I’m concerned people might now blame us for problems in the town.”

Resident Kaspars Suipe said: “It not true we have all this crime, the map is unfair.”

For the three months the map covers, from December 2010 to February this year, Albert Terrace is said to have had 83 crimes, including violent crime, one burglary, numerous anti-social behaviour offences, and ‘other’ crimes, including shoplifting.

But according to Boston police, there have only been two minor crimes at the road reported to them this year.

A police spokesman said: “Having investigated this it would appear there is a blip in the system with Albert Terrace. It’s very misleading for anyone looking at the crime map and thinking about moving to that area.”

Insp Phil Clark, from Boston Police Station, said: “It would seem the offences relating to Asda supermarket nearby are appearing within the Albert Terrace data when, in fact, this street has extremely low levels of crime.”

He added: “Like all major supermarkets, Asda is targeted by shoplifters but we have a very good relationship with the store and work with its staff to reduce offences.”

The crime map, launched by the Home Office in January, does not give specific addresses of incidents to protect individuals’ privacy.