Hate crime survey largely positive

BOSTON Borough Council has defended the latest results of its hate crime survey and said they were largely positive.

The council received 134 responses to the survey which looks at what residents think to hate crime and whether they have experienced and reported it, compared to 80 last year.

A council spokesman said this was a significant increase, and said that to get a representative sample of the whole of the borough there would need to be 382 responses.

They said that they could aim for a representative sample but this cannot always be achieved since some surveys capture the public interest more than others.

The council’s principal community safety officer Peter Hunn said: “I find the results positive in every way – more people completed the survey than the year before, fewer experienced hate crime, but of those who did a higher percentage felt they could report it this time.”

Some of the headline results for 2011 include 20 people (21 per cent) said they had experienced hate crime or knew someone who did.

Of these 17 people said they had reported it which meant 85 per cent of people who had experienced hate crime reported it.

This compared to 2010 when 35 people (44 per cent) said they had experienced hate crime or knew someone who did.

Of these 25 people said they had reported it which meant 71 per cent of people who had experienced hate crime reported it

The spokesman said the report showed the number of people experiencing hate crime had reduced this year but the figure of those experiencing and reporting it increased.

The results of the survey will be reviewed and actioned in line with the Strategic Assessment and Community Safety Partnership Plan and will be shared with the Equalities Board and Just Lincolnshire.