Crowds pay respects and witness the unveiling of new memorial

The Mayor of Boston Alison Austin pays her respects after unveiling the new war memorial, which was dedicated by the Rev Alyson Buxton.
The Mayor of Boston Alison Austin pays her respects after unveiling the new war memorial, which was dedicated by the Rev Alyson Buxton.

People in Boston paused yesterday (Tuesday) to reflect on those who have lost their lives in conflicts around the world.

A service took place in the memorial gardens on Wide Bargate to commemorate Armistice Day, as well as marking 100 years since the start of the First World War.

The Mayor of Boston Coun Alison Austin unveiled a new memorial, which was dedicated by the vicar of St Botolph’s Church the Rev Alyson Buxton.

Coun Austin said: “The amount of people here is a testament to their feelings about the community and the appreciation of the sacrifices 
made.

“The fact that people want to come and look, they have taken ownership of it because it was theirs. It’s been erected by their money, by their desire to make their own memorial.”

They were joined by members of armed forces organisations such as the Royal British Legion.

The polished granite memorial has been funded entirely by donations and is dedicated to the 627 men and women from Boston borough who were casualties in the First World War.

The names were on display at the unveiling, along with a roll of honour listing all those individuals, groups, organisations, schools and businesses who made donations.

The council organised the fundraising campaign, with Long Sutton stonemason Richard King waiving his fee and charging only for the cost of materials.

He and his team assembled the memorial in the Memorial Gardens over a period of three days.

Mr King said: “I’m very pleased that the turnout is excellent really. I’m really pleased that so many people wanted to look at the memorial.”

The reverse face has been left blank, to be engraved in four years time to commemorate the centenary of the end of the First World War.

Excess donations were used to pay for lighting for the memorial.