‘No man’s land’ pathway in Boston is cleared by a team of volunteers

Carol's residents' action squad in front of the 'no man's land' messy area shortly before cleaning it up. Pictured, front left, Julie South, with son Seb, seven, Kevin South, son Jake South, 21, Coun Carol Taylor and Ray North. NA
Carol's residents' action squad in front of the 'no man's land' messy area shortly before cleaning it up. Pictured, front left, Julie South, with son Seb, seven, Kevin South, son Jake South, 21, Coun Carol Taylor and Ray North. NA

A ‘NO man’s land’ of dumped rubbish and weeds has been cleaned up thanks to a team of volunteers.

Hardworking residents and their Boston borough ward councillor rolled up their sleeves to clean up the narrow pathway from Whiting Square, Boston, to Park Primary School.

The site had become a dumping ground for rusty bikes, builders’ rubble and litter – and was overgrown with tall weeds.

Coun Carol Taylor was joined by a small team of residents from either side of the path who worked hard to clean up the area.

She said: “It’s been a terrible eyesore, but, as the path goes nowhere, there is an easy solution.”

Coun Taylor exlained she is now looking to get the pathway incorporated into a willing neighbour’s garden and inquired with the Land Registry to determine who owns the narrow strip.

Previously access to the pathway used to exist from the school field but it has been barred and blocked off for about nine years since the area became a rubbish dump. It had also become an area where teenagers congregated.

Although no-one would reclaim responsibility for the area, Coun Taylor responded to residents’ concerns by forming her own action squad to take immediate action.

Boston Borough Council environmental operations staff had been at the site a couple of days earlier to deal with the rubbish – and whopping eight-foot high stinging nettles.

They then returned to take away the tons of other rubbish and weeds removed by Coun Taylor’s team.