FRONT PAGE: Memorial garden is now just an ‘Insult to war dead’

Broadfield Lane eyesore issue. L-R Tina Edgoose, Malc Edgoose, Tracey Burford, John Burford, Pat Batchelor and Sandra Priestley near the eyesore.
Broadfield Lane eyesore issue. L-R Tina Edgoose, Malc Edgoose, Tracey Burford, John Burford, Pat Batchelor and Sandra Priestley near the eyesore.

A memorial garden in Boston has become ‘an insult’ to the memory of the war dead that it was created to honour, according to angry residents living nearby.

Twenty-two trees were planted on the site next to Broadfield Lane Playing Field by local primary school pupils with help from council workers in 2013 as a memorial to the town’s soldiers who died in the First World War.

But Tina Edgoose, 68, from Francis Bernard Close, says grass around the trees has been left to grow waist high and the so-called meadow is a health hazard because it is filled with dog poo.

Mrs Edgoose said: “It’s not a memorial garden – it’s a memorial muddy mess.

“If my Granddad, who fought in that war, was to see the state that’s in, it’s not a memorial - it’s an insult.”

“It’s supposed to be a flower meadow and the only flower it’s got is that toxic ragwort, there’s no poppies or anything like that.”

Mrs Edgoose said the area was beautiful when first planted but now it is just waist high grass and weeds.

She said families used to picnic at the spot but they do not any more. “It’s a health hazard as well,” she said. “Some people who are not responsible dog owners are allowing their dogs to leave their faeces in there as well.”

Boston Borough Council insists the area was ‘specifically developed as a wild flower meadow’. A spokesman said they inspected the area on Tuesday where they removed about 10 plants of ragwort. They said they could not find any dog fouling in the area.

Mrs Edgoose, who has lived in her current home for 41 years, says she has talked to many of her neighbours who would also like to see the grass cut back in the field they once enjoyed.

“It’s making everybody’s life a misery,” she said. “What was then wild has gone passed wild and has become dangerous and a health risk.”

A spokesman for Boston Borough Council said in light of these new concerns the area was visited again - and they thanked them for bringing the ragwort to their attention.

A spokesman added: “The intention has always been to allow the area to develop naturally in order to attract wildlife, and is managed as such.

“The grass will be cut, but not routinely as it would if it was a recreation area.”

They added a footpath goes through the area so there should not be a need to walk in the long grass.

Coun Ben Evans, borough councillor for the Staniland ward, said: “I am already in discussion with a number of residents about this issue. Residents who have not already done so can contact me direct on 01205 205123 or email me at ben.evans@boston.gov.uk”