Grant the cat is granted a second shot at life

Grant the stray cat had terrible sores on his skin before his treatment at Pilgrim Vets- where he has been waiting for a new home for over a month.
Grant the stray cat had terrible sores on his skin before his treatment at Pilgrim Vets- where he has been waiting for a new home for over a month.

A stray cat who was found with horrific sores from scratching his mange-ridden skin has been given a second chance at life thanks to a Boston vets.

Grant the cat was taken into Pilgrim Veterinary Surgery after a member of the public spotted him roaming in the Boston area and took pity on him.

Grant receives his long-awaited cuddle following his successful skin treatments

Grant receives his long-awaited cuddle following his successful skin treatments

The animal was covered in painful scabs and sores which left him completely bald in some areas.

He was also feeling ‘very sorry for himself’ - as Pilgrim’s head veterinary nurse Ellie Patman explains: “He was in a terrible state. The vets here diagnosed him with mange which we treated, we also applied cream to his sore skin daily.”

The friendly cat desperately wanted affection from the staff, but they had to initialy avoid cuddling him.

“Grant is an extremely affectionate boy, and all he wanted was a proper cuddle,” said Ellie. “But unfortunately this type of mange mite can be transferred to humans so we had to be very careful with our contact with him. After a while, Grant was given the all-clear and we were finally able to touch him without gloves. He loved all his new attention.

Grant has been recovering well at Pilgrim Veterinary Surgery

Grant has been recovering well at Pilgrim Veterinary Surgery

Staff anaesthetised him, gave him a much-needed ‘pamper session’ including a bath and brush - followed by castration – ready to find a new home.

Unfortunately a blood test revealed Grant has the feline version of HIV - Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). This affects cats in a similar way to how HIV affects humans, but is cannot be transferred to human or other animals - only cats.

Ellie added: “It is carried in the saliva of cats and usually transferred through bite wounds when cats fight. Which is another reason why castrating cats early is so important as male entire cats fight. Unfortunately, this is something Grant will have to live with forever.”

Although he is recovering well, with his skin healed and most of his fur having now grown back, staff say poor Grant has been with them for over a month and is desperate for a new home.

Can you offer affectionate Grant a home?

Can you offer affectionate Grant a home?

However, the practice says Grant’s new home should not be with any other cats - unless they already have FIV - and he will need to stay indoors, although an outdoor run is recommended.

Ellie concluded: “What Grant really needs is somebody to give him lots of love and a lap to snuggle up on at night. Are you that special person that Grant has been waiting for? If you think you might be and would like to discuss and/or drop in to meet him, please contact us.”

If you think you could offer a suitable home to Grant, call Pilgrim Veterinary Centre on 01205 366872.

More information about FIV can be found on the Internation Cat Care website