Help to kick habit while in hospital

Phoenix Stop Smoking Service at Pilgrim Hospital's Outpatients Department, promoting their Stop Before Your Op project, L-R Marie Farrell, Eileen George, Tracey Matthewman.

Phoenix Stop Smoking Service at Pilgrim Hospital's Outpatients Department, promoting their Stop Before Your Op project, L-R Marie Farrell, Eileen George, Tracey Matthewman.

0
Have your say

Hospital patients are being given a helping hand to stub out their smoking habits to help ease their recovery from surgery.

Specialists from the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service are now on hand at the Pilgrim Hospital as part of a new ‘Stop Before Your Op’ campaign.

The campaign aims to highlight how patients who stop smoking before surgery are more likely to have a shorter stay in hospital with a reduced risk of developing post-surgery complications such as a stroke or heart attack.

Tracey Matthewman, Phoenix Stop Smoking specialist, said: “Undergoing any kind of surgery can be a stressful time, and quitting smoking ahead of your operation is one of the best things you can do to aid your recovery.

“Those who succeed in quitting will start to feel the benefit in 20 minutes as their blood pressure and pulse rate return to normal. Post operation, they will be less likely to be admitted to intensive care and more likely to have improved wound and bone healing.

“Anyone who would like help and advice can call and see us in the Outpatients department, call the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service on 0800 840 1533 or text SBYO to 07786 205128.”

Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust says smokers are four times more likely to succeed if they quit with Phoenix.

Support at the Pilgrim includes dedicated advice and support from specialist advisors, a range of treatments, carbon monoxide testing to keep people motivated and follow up support both in hospital and following discharge.

Eiri Jones, director of nursing at United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “As part of our health promotion and prevention responsibilities, the acute trust is working with partners on this important issue as part of the Making Every Contact Count (MECC) work.

“It is well known that giving up smoking requires much planning and encouragement, support and motivation and is very hard to do. We also know that smoking is very damaging for all smokers, but particularly harmful for those undergoing surgery.

“We’re delighted to be working in partnership with Phoenix, who helped over a thousand smokers to quit last year. It will be incredibly valuable having the service on site in our hospital to support our patients and help save lives. We are keen to support the pilot and any future roll out across the county.”