Ingram exhibition reveals hidden treasures

Boston. Saturday 10 September 2011'Official opening of the Herbert Ingram Exhibition at Fydell House, South Street, Boston.'L-R) Tim Elliott QC (his great great grandfather was William Little), High Sheriff Lincs Robin Battle, Heather Bowyer (Nee Ingram), Jackie Ingram and Peter Ingram (the great great grand children of Herbert Ingram)
Boston. Saturday 10 September 2011'Official opening of the Herbert Ingram Exhibition at Fydell House, South Street, Boston.'L-R) Tim Elliott QC (his great great grandfather was William Little), High Sheriff Lincs Robin Battle, Heather Bowyer (Nee Ingram), Jackie Ingram and Peter Ingram (the great great grand children of Herbert Ingram)

AN EXHIBITION looking at one of Boston’s most famous sons took place at Fydell House over the weekend.

Herbert Ingram was a local boy done good.

Boston. Saturday 10 September 2011'Official opening of the Herbert Ingram Exhibition at Fydell House, South Street, Boston.'Copies of exhibition items including an issue of The Illustrated London News which he founded

Boston. Saturday 10 September 2011'Official opening of the Herbert Ingram Exhibition at Fydell House, South Street, Boston.'Copies of exhibition items including an issue of The Illustrated London News which he founded

After leaving town to seek his fortune he founded the Illustrated London News, the first newspaper to use pictures.

But Boston stayed in his heart, and Ingram – whose statue stands beside The Stump – has been credited with being the man to bring fresh piped water and railways to Boston, during his stint as an MP.

The exhibition was organised by his great-great-granddaughter Jackie Ingram and included artefacts and relics from his life, such as previously-unseen pictures, copies of the Illustrated London News and other family items.

The High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, Robin Battle, opened the exhibition and guests who attended included chief executive of the Illustrated London News Lisa Barnard.

Ingram died in 1860 when the Lady Elgin, a boat he was travelling across Lake Michigan in, sank after colliding with another vessel.

He was travelling with his son at the time. They, along with hundreds of others, drowned.

Ingram’s body was discovered and buried in Boston’s Horncastle Road cemetery. His son’s body was never recovered.