DCSIMG

Pupil’s campaign for No Smoking day

Children from Park Academy with their no smoking sign in Bostons Central Park play area. Winning designer Wiki is pictured standing to the immediate right of the sign. Also pictured, Boston Borough Councils parks and open spaces portfolio holder, Coun Yvonne Gunter, and regulatory services portfolio holder, Coun Stephen Woodliffe.

Children from Park Academy with their no smoking sign in Bostons Central Park play area. Winning designer Wiki is pictured standing to the immediate right of the sign. Also pictured, Boston Borough Councils parks and open spaces portfolio holder, Coun Yvonne Gunter, and regulatory services portfolio holder, Coun Stephen Woodliffe.

Primary school children have been taking part in a campaign to get adults to think twice about lights up in play areas for No Smoking Day today (Wednesday)

Children from Staniland and Park Academies have designed new signs for play areas in Boston designed to persuade adults not to smoke around children playing.

Three posters by Wiki Wisniewska, 11, from Park Academy, have been put up in the Central Park children’s play area with two more by Gabija Visockyte, 10, from Staniland Academy in place at Woodville Road Park.

Another design will appear at Shelton’s Field near Park Academy.

Wiki said: “I made my sign look happy. Everyone is happy that there are no cigarette ends in the park.”

Children from the schools took part in a litter pick and helped Gary Husband, from Boston Allsigns, put the news signs into place.

They were joined by Big Cig, a grumpy-looking giant cigarette.

Jen Moore, Boston Borough Council’s environment and sustainability officer, said it was hoped the signs would make smokers think twice.

A council spokesman said the proposal to ask smokers to stop lighting up in children’s play areas in the town received ‘overwhelming’ backing following a consultation undertaken by Boston Borough Council and the Smokefree Lincs Alliance.

Findings from the consultation report showed that 96 per cent of the responses to the countywide survey were supportive, with a higher proportion (98 per cent) in favour of a voluntary ban at Boston play areas. The survey saw a total of 112 responses in Boston with 372 countywide.

The spokesman said Boston residents identified the benefits from smoke free play areas as children’s health (93 per cent), cleaner, safer environment (86 per cent), discourages smoking (52 per cent) and less tobacco litter (66 per cent).

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page