New dog fouling legislation could see body cameras used by Boston Borough Council staff

Bins, bags and signage aimed at dog walkers in Boston's Central Park. EMN-161013-091358001
Bins, bags and signage aimed at dog walkers in Boston's Central Park. EMN-161013-091358001
  • New rules could see dog walkers face £100 fixed penalty notice for not displaying intent to pick up faeces
  • Councillors told body cameras ‘could be considered’ for in-house staff
  • Council says it will require help of the public to identify problem areas

Council workers may be issued with body cameras as part of a crackdown on dog fouling which could see walkers face fines of up to £100.

Councillors on the Environment and Performance Scrutiny Committee were told on Wednesday, that the authority is currently negotiating with outside organisations, but has yet to make a decision about whether enforcement for new dog control powers would be handled by an external body or in-house.

Previous attempts at controlling dog poo have included spraying it pink.

Previous attempts at controlling dog poo have included spraying it pink.

The new Public Spaces Protection Order, could see the council introduce controls across the borough over dog fouling, excluding dogs from children’s play areas, asking people to comply with directions to put nuisance or dangerous dogs on leads and provide evidence that they were picking up dog poo.

Asked by Coun Jonathan Noble whether authorised officers would be equipped with body cameras, head of operations George Bernard said there was potential for the equipment.

He explained external organisations often did use them but there were no plans to give cameras to the council’s own staff - adding the council could consider it as part of the plans

He said; “There’s no reason why we can’t but it would be expensive.”

It’s not just about identifying people, it’s about getting them the security that they are less at risk of attack.

Boston Borough Coun Nigel Welton

Coun Nigel Welton suggested asking council operators if they would feel safer with cameras.

He said: “It’s not just about identifying people, it’s about getting them the security that they are less at risk of attack.

“How are our own employees going to feel if they are not going to be given the same amount of protection?”

A consultation looking at people’s support of the PSPO saw 362 responses, with 90-plus per cent of people in support of the new controls. A total of 74 per cent asked for a fine of £100 for those who did not comply, however, comments sent to the council suggested it could be more.

Councillors added that they would need the support of the public to contact the authority to report where incidents were happening.

Councillors voted in favour of recommending the PSPO order, with the £100 fixed penalty notice from February 1, 2017.