NOSTALGIA: This week in 1972 and 1982

This week in 1972 (from left) Mrs M. Smith, trainer, Mrs W. A. Stirk, trainer, Margaret Reynolds, Christine Malone, Wendy Killick, and Marion Holmes.
This week in 1972 (from left) Mrs M. Smith, trainer, Mrs W. A. Stirk, trainer, Margaret Reynolds, Christine Malone, Wendy Killick, and Marion Holmes.
  • Plea for better street lighting after murder
  • Teachers’ home hit by mortars in Falklands invasion

Pictured from this week in 1972 are the first aid team from the Boston Division of the Red Cross after winning the First Aid Cup in the branch competition.

It was the first time for many years that a Boston team had won the cup, The Standard reported.

Baby Stephen Holland in 1972 being held by mum Daphne and with them are, sitting, Barbara Young, Daphne's sister, and behind, proud grandparents Mr and Mrs George Pacey.

Baby Stephen Holland in 1972 being held by mum Daphne and with them are, sitting, Barbara Young, Daphne's sister, and behind, proud grandparents Mr and Mrs George Pacey.

A range of stories were carried in The Standard in the same week ...

A plea was made for improved street lighting in part of Boston following the murder of a grandmother.

Ivy Virgin, 57, was killed at her own council house gateway in deep darkness in November 1970. A 15-year-old boy would later plead guilty to the offence which took place in then gas-lit Jubilee Avenue.

This week, in 1972, Husband Walter spoke to The Standard about that night and made a call for better lighting.

People down here, with that night in their minds, are scared stiff after dark.

“People down here, with that night in their minds, are scared stiff after dark. They’ve gone through two winters and they don’t want to see a third with still nothing done,” he said.

- Work was soon to begin on a new £351,000 divisional police headquarters in Boston.

It was to be built on the Lincoln Lane development area opposite the parish church and was to replace accommodation in the Municipal Buildings into which the former Boston Borough Forced moved in 1904.

- Stephen James Holland was Christened at the Stump after travelling with his family 6,000 miles to Boston from his home in California. He was the first child of Daphne and Tom Holland, former Bostonians, who emigrated to America four-and-a-half years earlier.

This week in 1982 gave rise to a story about the Falklands War ...

One of the first homes to be hit when Argentina invaded the Falklands in early April 1982 belonged to an ex-Boston couple, The Standard reported.

Val and Rob Rutterford, formerly of South Parade, had, however, already left to stay with friends in the capital, Port Stanley.

The couple and their six-month-old twin daughters were subsequently flown off the island with other civilians by the Argentinians and were now back in the UK.

Val’s sister Linda Ayres, of Boston Road, Horncastle, said: “We went over to see them at the weekend and they were all very well.

“Their home is close to the sea front, and they had moved into the town to stay with friends. It was just as well, for their house was hit by mortars as the Argentinians landed and the British marines were trying to defend the perimeter.”

It was in January 1970 that Val and Rob – ex-teachers at Boston St Thomas’ School and Donington Secondary respectively – flew 8,000 miles to teach in the Falklands.

- Also, from this week in 1982, Lawrence and Jane Andrew, of Monteith Crescent, Boston, were to appear on Yorkshire Television quiz show ‘3-2-1’.

Up for grabs were a new car, a holiday, or the show’s bobby prize – Dusty Bin.