Olive looks back on a fruitful life at 100

Olive Wolverson celebrating her 100th birthday. Olive pictured with her children (from left) David Wolverson, Diane Smith and Liz Wolverson.
Olive Wolverson celebrating her 100th birthday. Olive pictured with her children (from left) David Wolverson, Diane Smith and Liz Wolverson.

Four generations of one family gathered in Boston on Saturday to celebrate the 100th birthday of the town’s Olive Wolverson.

The party at the New England Hotel included a guest aged some 99 years and 50 weeks younger than the birthday girl – a newborn great-grandchild named in honour of Olive as Evelyn Olive Wolverson.

Olive Wolverson was born Olive Doughty, in Edwin Street, off Pulvertoft Lane, during the First World War.

The decades that followed would, of course, bring the Great Depression and The Second World War.

The Depression, Olive remembers as a time in which there was ‘no money and little food’.

A holiday in those years, she says, was to spend a few days in a shed at Cut End, near where the Haven meets the Wash, with an uncle who was responsible for lighting the channel.

The Second World War would see her on fire watch for the Municipal Buildings and also act as a Red Cross nurse and was part of the response on the night Boston got bombed and seven people were killed in James Street.

Her working life would see her take on numerous role, starting as a ‘post girl’ at Fisher Clarks after leaving school at 14, before then taking on a junior office role at Jakemans. She would later move onto an office role at Boston Steam Laundry, becoming office manager there at 17.

After the war, she took on a position with the treasurer’s department in Holland County Council where she would meet future husband Keith Wolverson. The couple married in 1950 and would go on to have three children.

Olive, who sadly lost Keith in 2002, is today a grandmother to five and great-grandmother to eight.

She lives at the sheltered housing facility Mill Lodge, in Willoughby Road.

She says that in her head she does not feel 100 and puts her long life to ‘not drinking alcohol and staying active’.

David, her son, added that he also thinks it is because she has always had a strong social network and ‘remains content with what she has no matter what life has thrown at her’.