Operation Galileo ‘is here to stay’

Chief Inspector Jim Tyner, force lead on rural crime at Lincolnshire Police and ex-neighbourhood policing inspector for South Holland.
Chief Inspector Jim Tyner, force lead on rural crime at Lincolnshire Police and ex-neighbourhood policing inspector for South Holland.

The man in charge of policing rural crime in Lincolnshire has pledged to “consider all tactical options” in combating hare coursing countywide.

Chief Inspector Jim Tyner, ex-neighbourhood policing inspector for South Holland and now Lincolnshire Police’s force lead on rural crime, was responding to figures which showed a 300 per cent jump in the number of hare coursing reports across South Holland between 2014-15 and 2015-16.

A rural crime policing meeting took place last Wednesday after which Chief Inspector Tyner said: “From September 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016, there were 176 men arrested or reported for summons in relation to hare coursing incidents.

“In addition, 19 vehicles and three dogs were seized, while 93 other men were dealt with by other disruption tactics and enforcement action such as Directions to Leave and traffic offences.

“However. this was against a backdrop of a 300% increase in incidents of hare coursing reported in the Boston and South Holland area.

“Operation Galileo is here to stay, it will continue next season and we are considering all tactical options to prevent and disrupt hare coursing activity in Lincolnshire.”