Peasants set to revolt as part of Hanseatic Day celebrations

The Knights of Skirbeck will be leading a peasants' revolt on Saturday. Pictured are Lucy Wright of Boston in the stocks, with Knights member Darrin Merrett at an event last year.
The Knights of Skirbeck will be leading a peasants' revolt on Saturday. Pictured are Lucy Wright of Boston in the stocks, with Knights member Darrin Merrett at an event last year.

The peasants are revolting! Well, they will be on Saturday as part of Boston’s second International Hanseatic Day celebrations on Saturday.

With the event taking place between 10am-2pm, Boston’s prolific medieval re-enactment group The Knights of Skirbeck will lead the peasants’ revolt with singing, dancing and a short procession around the Stump.

The aim is to teach people about the Hanseatic League, of which Boston was a prominent part of between the 13th and 15th centuries, and which it joined the modern version of in 2015.

As part of the event on Saturday, youngsters will be able to try on armour and sign up for a Crusade.

Inside St Botolph’s Church the City of Lincoln Waites, a nationally-renowned group of medieval minstrels, will sing and make music in Boston Stump at noon.

A trumpeter on the Stump tower will herald the medieval procession to the tomb of Boston’s own Hanse merchant, Wissulus.

Also in the Stump will be a demonstration of spinning of Lincoln Longwool - the main source of Boston’s medieval wealth.

Boston’s Hanse Group will be on hand to promote the town’s membership of the modern day Hanseatic league.

The group has been working on a number of projects recently, including promoting the town in other European countries, researching the history of the town, creating new publications and trying to persuade local businesses to trade with the league.

Boston rejoined the Hanseatic League in 2015, after a 700 year absence. Boston was a warehousing site and trading partner with Hanseatic League countries in medieval times and owed much of its early prosperity to the trade it enjoyed from across the North Sea.

It joins 183 towns and cities here and throughout Europe in the Die Hanse, the modern-day Hanseatic League.

For more on Boston’s connection to the Hanseatic League, keep an eye on The Standard.