Show your support for town with bag for life

John Williamson, who has stood on Boston Market for 18 years, loads oranges into one of the limited-edition Boston Bags For Life. EMN-160607-160422001
John Williamson, who has stood on Boston Market for 18 years, loads oranges into one of the limited-edition Boston Bags For Life. EMN-160607-160422001

People in Boston are being urged to show their support for the town - and the enviroment - by grabbing a bag for life.

The limited-edition bags have been specially-branded with a logo illustrating the Stump, Maud Foster 
Mill, Guildhall and the market.

They come in their own small zip-up pouch, ideal to pop into a handbag or your pocket.

The bags are available at cost price of just £1 as a special promotion by Boston Borough Council and can be purchased from reception at Municipal Buildings in West Street.

Coun Michael Brookes, the council’s portfolio holder for waste services, said: “This is part of the council’s overall efforts to reduce litter, especially plastic bags.

“Plastic bags are still available from many retailers who do not have to make the statutory charge of 5p per bag. If people invest just £1 in a bag for life they can reduce the numbers of plastic bags and show their support for the town and its traders and their care for the environment at the same time.”

Shoppers are urged to use a reusable bag to carry their shopping home, or re-use ‘single use’ plastic bags that they already have. The council wants shoppers to consider refusing a bag if it is not really required.

Shopkeepers, interested in stocking the Boston Bag for Life can contact the council on 01205 314308. The bags can be supplied on a sale or return basis.

l Plastic bags are still a major global pollutant and do not biodegrade.

They are hardly ever recycled as plastic bags – energy is used to turn them into other things, which are then generally unrecyclable.

Burning plastic releases noxious fumes. Except for the small percentage that has been incinerated, every single molecule of plastic that has ever been manufactured is still somewhere in the environment, and some 100 million tons of it are floating in the oceans.