Take a step down Boston’s memory lane with our weekly nostalgia column...

Despite heavy rain almost 3,500 people turned out to the Boston and District Trades and Game Fair. The fair included show-jumping, clay-pigeon shooting and 40 trade stands. Money raised went to the Boston League of Hospital Friends. Pictured are the horse-jumping competition organisers: secretary Sue Page, Pat Barthorpe, Jill Robertson, Barbara Robertson and Shiela Nicholls.
Despite heavy rain almost 3,500 people turned out to the Boston and District Trades and Game Fair. The fair included show-jumping, clay-pigeon shooting and 40 trade stands. Money raised went to the Boston League of Hospital Friends. Pictured are the horse-jumping competition organisers: secretary Sue Page, Pat Barthorpe, Jill Robertson, Barbara Robertson and Shiela Nicholls.

70 years ago...1941

LIKE a scene out of a western, a runaway horse and dray was finally stopped after a hazadous chase through Boston.

Tom Howard, of Horncastle Road, Boston, was leaving his home one morning when he saw a horse, pulling a light empty dray, galloping unattended towards Boston.

Mr Howard immediately cycled after it but was unable to catch up. A car going in the same direction then gave chase.

The driver overtook it, stopped the car and then jumped onto the dray as it raced past.

He then crawled along the dray and onto the back of the horse before untying the reins and finally bringing it to a standstill near the catholic church. His name was Mr E. Pratt and he prevented what could have been a serious accident.

AN EAST coast district received a visit from a German raider at about 4am when there were a series of dull explosions.

Many persons rose hurriedly from their beds and civil defense squads were quickly on the scene. Happily, the Germans failed as despite dropping several bombs, no property was damaged and no-one was hurt.

THE Standard ran an appeal for ‘honesty in the name of humanity’ after an old lady lost all her money in town.

The elderly Boston woman went shopping with £10 in £1 notes rolled up in her bag before having lunch in Central Park. But she soon discovered she had misplaced the money – leaving her penniless. The Standard said: “Will the person who found the poor old lady’s fortune please return it to the Standard office.”

TWO men were killed when a faulty grenade went off during a Home Guard bombing practise in Fishtoft. The victims, one from Wrangle, the other Spilsby, were both married men. It is believed the grenade had a faulty fuse and exploded too quickly after the pin was taken out – juts a fraction of a second after it was thrown.

40 years ago...1971

A FREELANCE TV news cameraman from Boston became the news himself when he was involved in a dramatic plane crash.

Tony Jewers, formally of Elmwood Avenue, was working as a BBC cameraman in Leeds and flew from Leeds Airport in a Cessna to film a tragic motor-coach crash in Yorkshire. The plane landed at a glider aerodrome as it was the most convenient.

But after getting his film, Tony got back on the plane and it took off before crash landing back down, and sliding to within yards of a 300ft sheer drop. Tony and the pilot escaped with bruises and scratches.

Tony filmed the aftermath of the plane crash and both his films ended up being shown on BBC news that night.

SCRAP lorries dumped in two pockets of land in Broadfield Street, Boston, sparked an outcry from residents.

Apart from being ‘eyesores’, some mothers in the area were concerned the old vehicles could turn into a ‘death trap’ for children. One resident set up a petition to have the unstable vehicles removed.

BOSTON man Donald Woolhouse took upon the challenge of cataloguing old films and audio recordings made about the town in an attempt to create a lasting historical archive.

Mr Woolhouse, of Margaret Drive, said he felt such pieces of history should be preserved and aimed to collect all known recordings in the town. However, this became a race against time for Donald, as asides from the chance the old films could be lost or deteriorating, he was about to leave Boston for a job promotion in Customs and Excise after 30 years living in the town.

Despite heavy rain almost 3,500 people turned out to the Boston and District Trades and Game Fair. The fair included show-jumping, clay-pigeon shooting and 40 trade stands. Money raised went to the Boston League of Hospital Friends. Pictured are the horse-jumping competition organisers: secretary Sue Page, Pat Barthorpe, Jill Robertson, Barbara Robertson and Shiela Nicholls.

30 years ago...1981

PUNK rockers had a bad and undeserved reputation for being trouble-makers, said Boston punk fan Tony Smith.

And this was something he hoped to change by setting up a Boston ‘punk club’. The 27-year-old artist, who lived with his wife Sue in Cowbridge was hoping to form a club in the town with his brother Steve where fans could go along and listen and watch punk music shows. “The vast majority of punk bands are anti-war and advocate peace between nations and races,” he said.

A DOCTOR from Boston’s Pilgrim Hospital said it was disgraceful that, for the sake of a quiet life, cigarettes were being doled out to children in some county council homes.

The Standard revealed children as young as 14 in the homes were offered the chance to buy six cigarettes a day with pocket money provided by the social services. The permission of a parent or guardian was needed. Staff said the system helped to control unruly children – but Dr Cyril Nyman, cardio-respiratory physician, said he felt so deeply on the subject he was going to send a copy of The Standard’s report to the Royal College of Physicians in London and ASH – the anti-smoking campaign. “I had the greatest difficulty in believing what I was reading,” he said. “If this is true, I find it disgraceful.”

BOSTON fisherman John Barson’s part in the rescue of a dog from the river Haven cost him his supper. But animal-lover Mr Barson wasn’t complaining – as the sight of the dog safely on the riverbank was more than compensation him for the loss of his favourite dinner. While fishing for eels, Mr Barson spotted a golden labrador struggling in the water and dropped a life belt into the water. The dog seemed to be paddling towards it but it was heading for the High Street side where the bank was a sheer 12-foot down. “Suddenly this chap appeared, stripped off, went into the water and got the dog out,” said Mr Barson, of High Street. The rescuer was Peter Robinson, of Colwyn Bay, who was passing through Boston on his way to Lowestoft. Mr Barson took the rescuer back to his home for a wash and a cup of tea before he continued on his journey.

20 years ago...1991

A WARNING went out to shops and businesses in Boston to keep an eye out after reports that ‘brazen thieves’ were resorting to more daylight robberies in the town.

One local store manager was left shaken by the theft of £2,000-worth of cigarettes and cigars from his Boston town centre warehouse in broad daylight.

ABOUT £50,000 worth of wood shavings belonging to Snowflake Woodshaving company was lost when a blaze destroyed stock in storage. Some 600 tons of baled wood shavings were well alight on Marsh Lane when fire crews arrived. Two-thirds of the company’s stock was destroyed in the fire which took 46 firefighters several hours to contain. One even needed treatment for heat exhaustion. Fire chiefs were unable to pin down the cause of the fire but eyewitnesses told The Standard that a spark from a polythene shrink packaging machine may have been to blame.

LIFE was just peachy for a green-fingered pensioner from Holland Fen. Ivy Briggs, of Parsons Drove, planted a peach stone in her garden 10 years previously – and this year it gave her an enviable crop of the mouth-watering fruit. The stone was first put in a pot outside her kitchen in 1981 but when it grew into a small tree Ivy’s husband Sid planted it next to the greenhouse. The warm light reflecting off the greenhouse glass was believed to be the reason behind the tree’s success – giving the couple 20 juicy peaches.