Take a step down Boston’s memory lane with our weekly nostalgia column

United players Steve Raffell and Paul Casey imparted some of their football skills and experience to youngsters at York Street. Dozens of budding footballers, aged six-nine, attended the first of the Lincolnshire FA's autumn coaching courses. Striking out for the girls was Kelly Wilmot ' the only female on the course, is pictured here, holding the ball.
United players Steve Raffell and Paul Casey imparted some of their football skills and experience to youngsters at York Street. Dozens of budding footballers, aged six-nine, attended the first of the Lincolnshire FA's autumn coaching courses. Striking out for the girls was Kelly Wilmot ' the only female on the course, is pictured here, holding the ball.

70 years ago...1941

THREE Boston GPO telephone officials were complimented by magistrates on the speed in which they plugged through a hoax caller with an invasion scare story to the police station.

The workers also promptly traced the call box from which the call was made, in the early hours of the morning.

Their action enabled Pc Snowden to cycle to the call box and see the culprit just as he was leaving the box.

The 23-year-old local man was fined £10.

A VERDICT of ‘accidental death’ was recorded by Boston and District Coroner at an inquest into the death of a 27-year-old farm worker in Old Leake.

The man died after slipping from an eight-foot high haystack and landing astride a hay fork handle which penetrated his body and caused internal injuries.

THE Standard printed what it called a ‘prophetic epitaph’ – discovered by the paper’s Ulceby correspondent on a 500-year-old tombstone in an Essex churchyard. It read: “When pictures look alive and movements free, when ships, like fishes, swim beneath the sea, when man, outstripping birds, scan the ski – then half the world deep-drenched in blood, shall die.”

‘STAGGERING’ new figures were released about how much it had cost to maintain Boston General Hospital.

The amount was revealed to be five pence every minute, which equated to £30 a day, and £10,950 a year.

40 years ago...1971

MORE than 100 Boston old age pensioners were planning to forget their aches and pains for a ‘Pensioners’ Protest Parade’ – a slow march on Boston’s Head Post Office.

In what was expected to be the most ‘peaceful and slowest-moving demonstration the police had ever had to deal with’, the pensioners were on a march in protest at changes to their pensions.

The pension was set to increase the day of the protest but the OAPs would not see the benefit of it until at least April the following year.

SOME motorists using a plot of land in Boston as a temporary car park were unaware they were parking on consecrated ground – and taking a risk. The land, situated in White Horse Lane, off High Street, was the site of a 300-year-old Baptist cemetery – one of the few non-conformist cemeteries left in the country.

The graveyard had not been in use for many years and was falling into a state of disrepair – but some motorists who worked nearby were parking on it. “There are still lots of vaults there,” said Eric Burgess, secretary of the Baptist Church in Boston.

“And if anything or anyone heavy stands on there, they could find themselves disappearing.”

An inspection of the site some years previously revealed the land was starting to sink.

TWELVE ferrets were on the loose in the Kyme Road area of Boston after mysteriously disappearing from their cages.

The creatures belonged to the teenage son of Arnold Dawson, of Kyme Road. Mr Dawson said: “They could not have gotten out on their own.” Police were investigating.

30 years ago...1981

AN APPEAL was made for more volunteer marriage counsellors in Boston and Spalding to deal with a waiting list of couples in crisis.

The recession was blamed for taking its toll on married couples in the area – with more than ever getting into difficulties through the stress of redundancy and joblessness. The local council – the Boston and Spalding group – only had two counsellors.

One of them, Joy Knowles, of Sleaford Road, Boston, said: “We have a waiting list of people who want help and it’s pretty awful when, as sometimes happens, they wait and then say it’s too late.”

BOSTON Borough Council was asked to spend £1,080 on a special motorcycle-proof gate to keep ‘nuisance’ bikers off the riverbank at Fishtoft Road. Riders there were allegedly leaving litter for the council to clear up.

The plans were approved, but the gate and fence to be erected would incorporate a stile for those on foot.

THE Standard urged its readers not to panic buy meat following a new ruling by inspectors.

The work-to-rule, an improvement to the national grading structure, which the meat inspectors were pressing for, was said to be unlikely to have any affect on the amount of meat available in local shops.

Johnny Briggs – Coronation Street’s factory boss Mike Baldwin drew a big crowd in Boston’s High Street when he officially opened the new £50,000 Silver Dollar amusements arcade and cafeteria. After cutting the ribbon, he was besieged by youngsters and mums seeking an autograph.

20 years ago...1991

A COMPLETE oxygen mask with its intercom unit intact was one of the finds when Lincolnshire Aircraft Recovery Group carried out new excavation work on the remains of a Second World War American Liberator bomber at Wrangle Common.

Group member Martin Nutman said the four-engined bomber had been heading from its base in Norfolk on July 13, 1944, on a mission to Germany when it was forced to return after it began to ice up.

But on flying inland it started to break up and eventually came down in Wrangle. Of the nine-man crew, there was just one survivor who was badly injured when his parachute failed to open properly.

After the crash, American and British recovery teams spent a fortnight at the site removing bodies and bombs from the aircraft.

Previous digs at the site had unearthed an engine, propeller, fuel tank and radiator.

DRUGS, including morphine, valium and beta-blockers, were stolen from a doctors’ surgery in Stickney.

Police were appealing for information about the theft and warned the drugs could be dangerous if accidentally swallowed.

l A CANDLE knocked off a table set fire to clothing at a house in Boston’s Norfolk Street in the early hours of the morning.

The occupier, Mr Ladds, managed to tackle the fire himself and put out the flames before fire crews arrived.

No one was hurt but £400 of property in Mr Ladd’s lounge was destroyed.

United players Steve Raffell and Paul Casey imparted some of their football skills and experience to youngsters at York Street. Dozens of budding footballers, aged six-nine, attended the first of the Lincolnshire FA’s autumn coaching courses. Striking out for the girls was Kelly Wilmot – the only female on the course, is pictured here, holding the ball.