Take a walk down Boston’s memory lane with our weekly nostalgia column

A giant frog and a gang of hospital workers paddled an epic 30 miles down River Witham to raise �1,000 for the Pilgrim Scanner Appeal. The staff made the frog raft out of barrels, papier mache and chicken wire before painting it green. The journey took them about 20 hours. Team spokesman Leslie Eddowes said: 'We never even got one toe wet!'
A giant frog and a gang of hospital workers paddled an epic 30 miles down River Witham to raise �1,000 for the Pilgrim Scanner Appeal. The staff made the frog raft out of barrels, papier mache and chicken wire before painting it green. The journey took them about 20 hours. Team spokesman Leslie Eddowes said: 'We never even got one toe wet!'

45 years ago...1966

A WEATHER balloon launched from St Thomas’ Junior School in Boston was found in Meudenim Sauerlanmd, West Germany – four months and 500 miles after leaving Lincolnshire.

45 years ago...1966

A WEATHER balloon launched from St Thomas’ Junior School in Boston was found in Meudenim Sauerlanmd, West Germany – four months and 500 miles after leaving Lincolnshire.

The balloon was launched as part of a school study of wind and weather conditions. A tag with information on it attached to the balloon was found in a forest and returned in the post to the school.

THREE Boston girls wrote to The Standard to say they were ‘just three of the town’s many fed-up teenagers’.

The three, Miss M. A. Clayton, Sandra Blanchard and Miss C. A. Oyitch, were pleading for the council to provide them with more entertainment in the town. An excerpt from the letter read: “What entertainment do we have? “One dance hall, two cinemas, sports clubs and a jazz club, but not everyone is sports-minded or likes jazz.

“On Sunday, when everyone has a day off there’s nothing to do – no wonder teenagers are noted for walking the streets and taking drugs.”

BOSTON was gearing up for two spectacular shows. Motown legend Otis Redding was to play at the Gliderdrome’s Starlight Rooms while the Old Drill Hall was to host a ladies’ wrestling match.

WORK began to construct a road to Haven Bridge which was designed to enable motorists to drive straight on and off the new bridge at the High Street end.

Traffic lights were also to be installed to control the traffic flow.

35 years ago...1976

BOSTON clergy were protesting about the possibility of what they called an ‘erotic film’ being made in this country about the life of Jesus.

The Holland East Deanery wrote to the Home Secretary to ask him to use all his powers to stop the film being made and distributed.

The letter was signed by the Vicar of Boston, Canon Trevor Collins, who described the film as ‘an affront to the feelings of Christian people and a degradation of humanity itself’.

The would-be film was by a Danish film director called Jens Jorgen Thorsen. “I am not in favour of censorship,” Canon Collins wrote,

“But there is no evidence of a sexual nature about the life of Christ.”

A THREE-year-old boy was snatched to safety from a water-filled pit after a Boston docker heard his playmate’s screams for help.

Reg Lewis, of Sunningdale Drive, plunged fully-clothed into stagnant water in the pit, known locally as the ‘bottomless pit’ – to reach young Jonathan Doughty, of Ingram Road.

“The water was up to my chest and I could feel I was treading on old bedsteads and cars,” said Mr Lewis, who had to run 100 yards and climb over a barbed wire fence to rescue the boy.

Jonathan was taken to hospital after swallowing water and suffering from shock. Parents in the area had previously campaigned (unsuccessfully) for a safety fence to be put up around the pit.

A BOSTON accountant and father took it upon himself to open a self-run youth club for the town. Gerald Parker, of Lindis Road, had three teenagers himself and said he knew what it was like for young people in the town to have nowhere to go.

“I took a walk around Boston the other day and there were kids sitting in doorways,” Mr Palmer said.

“I asked them why they were loafing about and they said they had nowhere to go.”

He also saw young girls out drinking brandy. “It’s a very poor situation that young people have to turn to drink because there’s nothing else to do,” he added.

25 years ago...1986

A BID to dump nuclear waste in Lincolnshire took a new turn as the nuclear waste agency Nirex prepared to take legal action against the protesters’ blockades.

One of the sites was at Fulbeck, just 25 miles from Boston.

There were growing fears that Lincolnshire was a central target in the search for deep burial sites for highly-radioactive waste.

SHEER laziness and a general lack of awareness was blamed for the borough’s growing litter problem. A meeting was set up with the Keep Boston Tidy management committee.

It was discovered that more thought about how we discard our rubbish could help the borough council to save some of the £430,000 it spent a year on tidying up the Boston area. Members at the meeting heard that this saved money could then go towards improvement schemes the ratepayers want.

A NEW £1.9 million 11-mile long Spalding to Sutterton bypass was given the go-ahead. The work on the new road was set to begin in 1989.

A giant frog and a gang of hospital workers paddled an epic 30 miles down River Witham to raise £1,000 for the Pilgrim Scanner Appeal. The staff made the frog raft out of barrels, papier mache and chicken wire before painting it green. The journey took them about 20 hours. Team spokesman Leslie Eddowes said: “We never even got one toe wet!”

15 years ago...1996

A NEW £52,000 adventure playground called ‘Magical Mayhem’ was officially opened in Fenside, Boston.

Mayor Coun Albert Tebbs cut the ribbon to the Ingelow Avenue site’s, new attractions – which included basketball, netball, an assault course and a zip line.

VINTAGE tractor enthusiasts were able to take a step back in time at Leverton during the village’s popular vintage working day and horticultural show.

The event featured vintage farming equipment and visitors got to see how a harvest was carried out in bygone days.

TERRIFIED pensioners living at Joy Paine Close, in Boston, said they were living in fear while continuing to campaign for a new roadway that would save them having to travel down Ingelow Avenue to get to their homes.

“I’m a nervous wreck, some of us daren’t even leave our homes and we can’t sleep at night,” said one pensioner. Residents said a gang of youths were reguarly blocking their way when they drove to the end of the avenue. Another resident said; “We don’t feel safe - you come into Ingelow Avenue and it’s a world of its own and we are absolutely terrified.”

Residents spoke of continued vandalism, verbal abuse and burglaries in the area.

AN ACTION-packed day of ‘madness and mayhem’ for the annual raft race organised by Boston PHAB, saw £1,500 raised for the charity.

The event was held at Nunns Bridge, Fishtoft, and drew a crowd of about 700 people who watched devious acts of ‘piracy’ and ‘cheating’ including one raft attacking another head-on and breaking its bow, and flour bombs being thrown.

Boston and district PHAB was a charity which supported physically handicapped and able-bodied people.