Trainer: ‘Want to get fit? It’s not a diet you need...it’s a lifestyle change’

Josh Goodfellow

Josh Goodfellow

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For those looking to carry out that tradition of losing the Christmas pounds and getting fit trainer Josh Goodfellow, who works at Work House Gym and runs JG Fitness has given The Standard some tips.

For those looking to carry out that tradition of losing the Christmas pounds and getting fit trainer Josh Goodfellow, who works at Work House Gym and runs JG Fitness has given The Standard some tips.

Firstly, he said, there’s no better time than now, not just at Christmas, not just the New Year, not the middle of the year – but now.

He said: “I’m not a fan of new year, new you.

“What I would say is that if you are going to go with a new goal – starting the gym or change your body – there’s no better time than today. Why use the new year to start when the best time to start is now?”

For those who choose to start a new regime, who want to lose weight or ‘buff up’, here are some of Josh’s tips...

Make sure you plan set goals, be realistic and make them achievable but set at least three – a short-term, mid-term and long-term goal, for example 2lb in 3 weeks and 5lb in six weeks.
As you progress along your goals don’t forget to keep an eye and adapt them, some goals may need changing depending on the individual.


If you can’t afford a gym membership remember there are plenty of open spaces out and about to get moving. 
Josh said take the opportunity to run along some of Boston’s rivers, or through Central Park, or even use the outside space there for other keep fit regimes.


Don’t be afraid to ask for help. If you are a member of a gym ask, use the resources that are there. Josh said: “In health and fitness, regardless of who you are, we’re all singing from the same hymn sheet, we’re all trying to achieve a better vision of ourselves. People are always going to be on hand to help.” 
He said you can also use the internet, but to be careful what advice you follow or products you buy – ask advice if possible.
“Don’t always believe what you read on the internet, it’s a massive propaganda market, there’s going to be helpful tips and non-helpful tips,” he said.


Be consistent and push through the first few weeks.
Josh said: “The biggest thing is consistency, people say things become habitual after 21 days and the first three weeks are when we start to become habitual.
“You’re not going to feel great at the start, your body will be adapting to the changes - just because you don’t feel right within the first few weeks don’t give up because that’s the crucial stage.”


Don’t fall for fad diets – eat and drink right.
Everybody is different and what works for one person might not work for another, try to avoid fad diets and find what works for you, said Josh.
Josh said one of the most underestimated things anyone can do is drink lots of water - one of the most underused resources in getting fit.
You can eat chocolate too - but make sure you plan it in. Say ‘I would like to eat some chocolate tomorrow’, or say ‘I can have this big meal or five small snacks a week’ but plan them in and balance them out.


Make sure you want to do it, and try not to let others or your confidence over your body image put you off.
Some people get put off running because they worry what people will think when they see them, butJosh said try not to let that affect your.
“If you are keeping fit for somebody else you are doing it for their benefit, not your own. You have to do it for the right reasons otherwise there’s no point doing it,” said Josh.


Don’t be put off by blips in your regime, don’t use scales, use a mirror to judge your progress.
“I have had clients with overal goals of changing their body composition and they have been three or four weeks in and they have lost weight and in week five they put on weight,” said Josh.
“But look in the mirror and ask how you feel, the mirror is the best guide you can have – it won’t mislead you.”