Water way to get to work every morning

A Spalding Water Taxi, could Boston soon have similar running on a daily basis. ENGANL00120121124091029

A Spalding Water Taxi, could Boston soon have similar running on a daily basis. ENGANL00120121124091029

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You could soon find yourself taking a water taxi to work - if groundbreaking new plans get the go-ahead later this year.

The Standard has learned that a French transport company are in talks with Boston Borough Council and the Environment Agency about creating a public transport network across the area’s fenland waterways.

It is believed that Poissons D’Avril - who currently operate a similar system in several European cities such as Amsterdam, Paris, Venice and Madrid - are hoping to bring in a trial scheme by the end of the year.

But first they would have to get the all-clear from the local authorities.

“Driving into Boston at busy times can be a nightmare,” said director of communications Lilo Parfo.

“But imagine if you could leave your car at home and take the water taxi into work?

“This could be like your Into-Town bus system, but without going through your town centre, obviously.”

Mr Parfo is confident that the scheme could be a big hit in the town and, if successful, he is mooting the idea of extending the service to include school runs.

The big-thinking business is also hoping to introduce a link-up between Boston and Lincoln’s Brayford Wharf, once work on the Waterways Link Project comes to an end.

Initial plans hope to have regular water taxi stops on the Haven, Witham and Maud Foster Drain, allowing villagers and Bostonians on the town’s outskirts an alternative way to travel, as well as cutting congestion.

Nearby Spalding currently operates a water taxi service, meaning there could also one day be a possibility of a Welland-Haven link-up scheme.

However, not everyone is happy about the ideas.

Olaf Prilo, head of the Boston Angling Club, said it would cause havoc to parts of the local economy which makes its money from angling.

“I’m not happy, and I doubt the ducks are either,” he told The Standard.