Why not try out ‘curling on carpet’?

Boston Indoor Bowls Club.'Some of the club's junior members Jack Taylor-Cook 11 bowling watched by L-R Nathan Dunnington 14, Liam Reeson 13, Kathryn Rockall 12, Caitlin Moore 10, Lewis Skinner 17, Tom Thurston 12, Rebecca Clare 15 and junior coach Rob West. EMN-140403-105934002
Boston Indoor Bowls Club.'Some of the club's junior members Jack Taylor-Cook 11 bowling watched by L-R Nathan Dunnington 14, Liam Reeson 13, Kathryn Rockall 12, Caitlin Moore 10, Lewis Skinner 17, Tom Thurston 12, Rebecca Clare 15 and junior coach Rob West. EMN-140403-105934002

“People are now calling it curling on carpet, we used to call curling bowls on ice.”

That’s how Boston Indoor Bowling Club director Richard White joked about the influence the Winter Olympics has recently had on sport.

Indeed, basics may be similar, but while a quick game of curling needs an ice rink, the ability to skate and some spare brooms, bowling remains a lot more accessible in Boston.

And that’s what the town’s bowling club are hoping to show as they host an open day at their Rosebery Avenue home on March 15.

From 10.30am to 3.30pm, lapsed players or newcomers are invited to try out the sport on the venue’s six wheelchair-friendly rinks.

For the serious competitor, Boston Indoor Bowling Club has a strong pedigree.

The club, which currently has more than 700 members, has produced a World Champion in the shape of Bex Field, along with Matt Whyers, Chelsea Tomlin and Sarah McKay, who have all represented England at under 25 level.

The Ladies’ team have won the national Yetton Trophy six times, with the men picking up the Denny Cup in 1951.

But with the club open seven days per week, there remains plenty of scope for social bowling.

Annual membership costs £30 (£15 juniors) and shoes and bowls can be borrowedt. For details call Tanya Brown on 01205 363156.