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Boston’s BRIT Award winner: “You have to take a risk to get success”

Alan Moulder & Flood (Mark Ellis) UK Producer of the year winners (L to R).The Music Producers Guild Awards, Park Plaza Riverbank London :Thursday, Feb 13. 2014 (Photo John Marshall/JM Enternational)

Alan Moulder & Flood (Mark Ellis) UK Producer of the year winners (L to R).The Music Producers Guild Awards, Park Plaza Riverbank London :Thursday, Feb 13. 2014 (Photo John Marshall/JM Enternational)

An ex Boston Grammar School pupil who won a BRIT Award for his production work told the town’s aspiring musicians to ‘take a risk’ to get success.

Alan Moulder, 54, was given the award for best producer with partner Flood, for their work on Foals’ new album Holy Fire.

Alan told The Boston Standard: “It’s not something I expected to win, I think Flood and I don’t really think of ourselves as mainsteam or by the establishment. We’re still under the illusion we’re indie and underground.”

Alan was born in Boston and grew up on Spilsby Road, going to Boston Grammar School and later working for the Ministry of Agriculture in Kirton until the age of 24.

“There were good teachers, I had a fun time at school... that’s why I failed my A-levels,” joked Alan – who fondly recalls teachers such as Richard Anderson and Rod Dunn.

As the youngest person in the household, his family inspired him to get into music.

He then went on to join a number of local bands playing their own music in pubs and clubs – although wouldn’t be drawn on names.

“Nobody would have heard of them, they never did anything, they were just local bands,” he said.

He said the town’s music scene was ‘pretty good’ adding, “There was quite a lot of cover bands who did the pubs and clubs and who were really good.

“They were inspiring at how adept they were at doing it.”

During this time he met people he would later join in London, leading him to rise through the ranks to the point where he opened Assault and Battery – a production company – with Flood eight years ago.

For those wanting to get into music he said: “You have to follow your instinct really. For me it was taking a big risk. I left what was considered a stable job in civil services, I took a risk and a pay cut and started at the bottom, working my way up.

“You just have to take that risk.”

 

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