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Public backlash against report claiming Boston is seventh least musical part of the UK

Promoting upcoming  Boston Youth Jazz Orchestra concert in aid of the Mayor's Charities in the Market Place Musical Director Lee Hextall, Lulu Albelda (18), Harry Hextall (17) with The Mayor of Boston Councillor Paul Kenny sharing a Microphone with  Becky Huggins (17)

Promoting upcoming Boston Youth Jazz Orchestra concert in aid of the Mayor's Charities in the Market Place Musical Director Lee Hextall, Lulu Albelda (18), Harry Hextall (17) with The Mayor of Boston Councillor Paul Kenny sharing a Microphone with Becky Huggins (17)

The Boston public have hit back at a university report which claims the town is the seventh least musical part of the country.

A study by Goldsmiths Univerisyt of London ranked Boston as the seventh worst place in the country for musical skills and abilities.

The Standard broke the news online - which was swiftly followed by an angry backlash from many in the town.

Mayor of Boston Paul Kenny challenged the writers of the report to come to his charity concert at the Gliderdrome on Saturday featuring Boston Youth Jazz Orchestra and Boston Youth Pop Choir so they could see some of the town’s top talent.

“I am more than happy to throw down the challenge,” he said. “Come down and tell me whether you think there’s any musical ability here before you give us this reputation that we don’t deserve.”

Boston comedy rappers 50 Sniffs said: “Over here at camp Sniffs - the boys are fuming that a survey has determined there is little musical talent in Lincolnshire,” with frontman Jimmy May now planning to put together an online radio showcase of the local talent.

The researchers claim to have studied data from more than 94,000 participants across the UK – with neighbouring East Lindsey ranked ninth and North Lincolnshire sixth – marking out the area as a musical black spot.

Yet the survey comes just a fortnight after Boston-born producer Alan Moulder picked up a BRIT Award for best producer on the Foals’ album.

The university says the study found a high correlation between how musical people are and the average income of the area where they live.

Mark Whelan, from the flood aid group which is organising a concert for Central Park this summer said: “We have some of the best young musicians in the country. In November the Lincolnshire choir and wind orchestra, consisting of many young Boston musicians played at the royal Albert hall. Boston youth pop choir were finalists in the national Music for youth Festival in 2012. Boston youth jazz orchestra have won national awards and also played at RAH. I would challenge anyone to find a more committed, talented and dedicated bunch of individuals anywhere in the country that could surpass those in Boston. The Lincolnshire music service is second to none and with Boston as their base I utterly refute the statement made by some know-it-all linking music to income per capita. Scientific research? I think not.

He added: “Our town has a lot to be proud of, especially our musical talent. Let’s stop people bashing us down and get them to understand the talent that we have.”

Chloe Day from Boston College student-based record label Ademicca Records said: “We have a lot of talent here, we just don’t have enough places to showcase it.”

 

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