Go-ahead for Puritan tourist attraction in Boston

Puritan Path at Boston Stump.'L-R John Cammack, Steve Lumb - head of development at Boston Borough Council, Rev Chris Wedge, David Espin - stone contractor, Judy Cammack - chairman of Historic Boston's Parnership looking at plans for the planned Puritan Path.
Puritan Path at Boston Stump.'L-R John Cammack, Steve Lumb - head of development at Boston Borough Council, Rev Chris Wedge, David Espin - stone contractor, Judy Cammack - chairman of Historic Boston's Parnership looking at plans for the planned Puritan Path.

A long-held dream to create a tourist attraction to mark 12 Puritans who left the town for America will become a reality by Easter.

The Puritan Path Project will see 13 stone memorials put in either side of the footpath to the south of Boston Stump that runs from the Market Place to the River Witham.

The stones commemorate the 12 Puritan men and women who had worshipped at the church and left England for the New World in the 1630s as part of the Massachusetts Bay Company.

A brass plaque will be laid in the footpath and 11 stones will be carved with the name of the person and the date of sailing.

A twelth stone will be sited by the Cotton Chapel, with a slate insert carved with autobiographical details of the Rev.John Cotton and a verse by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

At the end of the ‘path’ by the river wall, a further stone will portray their vision of ‘A city upon a Hill’.

Funding for the £15,000 project comes from The Historic Bostons’ Partnership, The Wash Fens Local Action Group, The Boston Stump Restoration Trust, The Friends of Boston Stump, The Partnership of the Historic Bostons, and Boston Borough Council.

The project has been helped along by John and Judy Cammack.

Project spokesman Peter Coleman said: “These memorials, the only one of their type in the United Kingdom will be set in the most appropriate setting, adjacent to the church in which these men and women worshipped. The story of the founding of Boston, Massachusetts is a very important but little-recognised part of the heritage of St Botolph’s Church, the town and the country.”