NOSTALGIA ... Campaign for new off-licence in West Street fails in 1964 and US music chain coming to Boston in 1994

More than 100 GCSE Latin pupils from 10 schools converged on Boston High School 25 years ago for a day of activities. The highlight was a lecture on Emperor Nero called Murder by Mayhem given by Dr Peter Jones of Newcastle University.
More than 100 GCSE Latin pupils from 10 schools converged on Boston High School 25 years ago for a day of activities. The highlight was a lecture on Emperor Nero called Murder by Mayhem given by Dr Peter Jones of Newcastle University.
  • 1964: Hundreds sign petition for off-licence in West Street, plus plans for small traffic-free shopping centre off Market Place
  • 1994: Major US music chain set to arrive, bid to close town footbridge fails, and chippie named best in region

Fifty-five years ago, 1964 ...

* Nottingham Co-operative Society failed in its second bid to secure an off-licence for its supermarket in West Street, Boston – despite 730 signing a petition in favour of it.

Another scene from the lecture at Boston High School.

Another scene from the lecture at Boston High School.

A similar request had been rejected three years earlier.

Paul Hughes, speaking on behalf of the society, said: “Some three years ago the idea that a supermarket should have an off-licence was, perhaps, a fairly novel idea, but now a number of supermarkets in different parts of the country have been granted licences.”

Several businesses had objected to the plans. They were represented at Boston Transfer Sessions by Mr J. S. Philpot who said supplies in the area were ‘adequate’.

* An application had been made for a small traffic-free shopping centre behind Boston’s Strait Bargate, running up near to Pump Square and Marks & Spencer.

Some three years ago the idea that a supermarket should have an off-licence was, perhaps, a fairly novel idea, but now a number of supermarkets in different parts of the country have been granted licences.

The centre was expected to have about 20 shops, car parking, and a public house to replace the Masons Arms, with access from Strait Bargate and the Market Place.

Pescod Hall, at that time used by the Arts and Crafts Society and a firm of electrical engineers, would be retained as a designated historic building.

Twenty-five years ago, 1994:

* A major American music chain was coming to Boston.

Yorkshire TV at Tate's, in Boston, with future Police and Crime Commissioner Alan Hardwick conducting the interview.

Yorkshire TV at Tate's, in Boston, with future Police and Crime Commissioner Alan Hardwick conducting the interview.

Sam Goody was due to open a branch in Strait Bargate in the first week of May.

The business was part of the Musicland Group which at the time had 1,300 stores across the US.

This would be its 11th branch in the UK.

* West Street traders failed in an attempt to close St Botolph’s footbridge in Boston.

The request – made in the hope of bringing more shoppers to West Street – was thrown out by the borough council’s Environment Committee, with not a single hand raised in support of the plan.

A petition asking for the closure gained 51 signatures from businesses in the area, but had been met with a counter-petition of 1,700 signatures opposing the move.

Councillors agreed to try to improve the area by placing better signs through the town centre and preparing an environment enhancement scheme for West Street.

* Boston chippie Tate’s was named as the best fish and chip shop in the Yorkshire Television region.

The New Street business came out tops in a competition run by Calendar which invited people to write in and nominate their favourite shop.