NOSTALGIA: Campaigner Mary Whitehouse in Boston in 1969 and town bakers closes after 135 years in 1999

Here we see members of the Rainbow Kids Club celebrating National Kids' Club Week in July 1999. The youngsters held a tropical-themed party to mark the occasion. The event was attended by the Mayor and Mayoress, Coun Paul Goodale and wife Angie.
Here we see members of the Rainbow Kids Club celebrating National Kids' Club Week in July 1999. The youngsters held a tropical-themed party to mark the occasion. The event was attended by the Mayor and Mayoress, Coun Paul Goodale and wife Angie.
  • 1969: Visit to Boston by ‘Clean Up TV’ campaigner and Phantom jet crashes in village
  • 1999: Town bakers closes after 135 years and strike action at Port of Boston

Fifty years ago, 1969 ...

* ‘Clean Up TV’ campaigner Mary Whitehouse came to Boston.

I don’t say television is solely responsible, but it has probably had the biggest single contribution.

Mrs Whitehouse was the main speaker at a one-day conference held by the Christian Education Movement at Blackfriars.

That evening, she gave a speech at Woodhall Spa to an audience of 60 mums, dads, and grandparents, plus a couple of teenagers (who walked out halfway through).

Speaking about the impact of TV on society, she said crime was on the increase, as was venereal disease, breakdowns in mental health, illegitimacy, and broken homes.

“I don’t say television is solely responsible, but it has probably had the biggest single contribution,” she said.

* A Phantom jet aircraft from RAF Coningsby crashed in a field near the centre of Miningsby, between Boston and Horncastle.

The two occupants used their ejector seats and parachuted to safety.

Parts of the aircraft were scattered over two fields, while one engine and the tail assembly came to rest on the edge of a spinney surrounding Miningsby Grange and only a few yards from a bungalow.

Fuel tanks exploded and parts of the plane burst into flames after the crash.

Twenty years ago, 1999 ...

* After 135 years, J. W. Loveley and Son, the Boston bakers and confectioners, was closing down.

Loveley’s was set up by John Loveley in Dolphin Lane in 1854; he was aged 17 at the time.

About 25 years later, it moved to the Market Place where for a period the family also ran a hotel.

In the early 1990s, it re-located back to Dolphin Lane.

At the time of its closure, it was being run by John Loveley’s great-grandson, also called John Loveley.

With no one in the family to take over the business, it was due to close on Saturday, July 15.

“It’s going to be a wrench. I started learning the trade when I was about seven and they gave me a special, small tray which held just six loaves. It was all I could manage to carry,” said Mr Loveley.

The premises had been bought by Boston butcher John Swain.

* Industrial action brought the Port of Boston to a standstill.

Some 89 dockers staged an all-out strike following the abolition of the National Dock Labour Scheme.

The scheme licensed dock employers and provided job-for-life security for dockers.