NOSTALGIA: Cow ban on Cow Bridge in 1958 and Premiership trophy comes to Boston in 1998

Manchester United fans Nathan Harrison, 10, and Aaron Bradshaw, nine, with the FA Carling Premiership trophy in Boston 20 years ago. The trophy, which would be won by United that season, was in town as part of a tour of the country.
Manchester United fans Nathan Harrison, 10, and Aaron Bradshaw, nine, with the FA Carling Premiership trophy in Boston 20 years ago. The trophy, which would be won by United that season, was in town as part of a tour of the country.

This week (August 23 edition) in 1958 ...

* Cows had been banned from crossing Cow Bridge.

The Lincolnshire River Board had erected a metal barricade across the mouth of the bridge north of Boston, putting a stop to a practice which had been going on for more than a hundred years.

“The bridge, which was built in 1811, spans the Maud Foster Drain,” the Standard wrote. “It provides access to three houses, a pathway to Spilsby Road and of course, the land on the east side of the drain.”

One farmer who owned land on both sides of the drain was John Grant, of Malcolm Farm.

When the barricade appeared he immediately contacted the River Board. The explanation offered was the cattle had caused damage to the bridge.

He dismissed this idea as preposterous, saying: “I’ll get you a spanner and you try and damage the bridge. It’s impossible. It was designed to take cows. Farmers have used it for years.”

A spokesman for the River Board said: “So far as our records are concerned it is a footbridge. Damage has been caused and so we are stopping cattle crossing.

“The barricade will remain where it is.”

This week in 1998 ...

* The FA Carling Premiership trophy was on its way to Boston – but only for the weekend.

The impressive piece of silverware – at that time held by Arsenal – would be on show at the Boston United Social Club as part of a tour of the country.

People would be able to have their picture taken with the trophy, while members of the Carling promotional team dished out plenty of free goodies, the Standard wrote.

* Quadring schoolgirl Katherine Ball had shared tea and cake with Prime Minister Tony Blair and wife Cherie.

Katherine, 11, who had just left Quadring Primary School, was among about 20 children chosen for the trip to London.

The youngsters visited the House of Commons and the House of Lords and watched debates in progress before dropping in at 10 Downing Street for tea and a tour round.

* A party of representatives from Boston Borough Council were among the guests of honour in the harbour of Boston, Massachusetts, for the arrival to the city of HM Bark Endeavour.

The vessel, a replica of the ship Captain James Cook used to sail to Australia and New Zealand in the second half of the 18th century, had visited Boston, Lincolnshire, the previous year.