NOSTALGIA: Looking ahead to Haven Bridge (PANORAMA)

Looking across the Haven.
Looking across the Haven.

Here we see a series of photographs taken by the Standard 60 years ago, showing the location of a proposed new bridge for Boston.

The bridge was expected to cross from just south of Fydell Crescent to the entrance of Rowley Road.

Looking over the Haven to the junction of Fydell Street and High Street.

Looking over the Haven to the junction of Fydell Street and High Street.

It was designed to be the first step in a solution to Boston’s problem of traffic congestion.

The bridge would connect with a proposed ‘inner relief road’ for the town – what would become John Adams Way.

At the time of these photographs (January 1959), though, there was disagreement over what route the road should take – and there had been for some time.

In December 1956, a two-day inquiry was held at Boston into the county council’s suggested route for the road, which would run from Rowley Road to Wide Bargate.

Our proposed route would open up wonderful opportunities of re-development to the commercial properties right in the heart of the town.

The council’s view was that the road’s Wide Bargate junction should be through Silver Street, opposite the Post Office.

It would leave the proposed bridge, swing round across Shodfriars Lane, Spain Lane, one side of Pump Square, then run along Silver Street into Wide Bargate.

However, objectors proposed an alternative that deviated from the council’s at the end of Spain Lane. This route would go on to swing across a bowling green, go over Main Ridge, before cutting across areas to follow Cheyney Street to Mill Hill, making a roundabout junction with Wide Bargate.

The council said: “Our proposed route would open up wonderful opportunities of re-development to the commercial properties right in the heart of the town.”

The South Square area, with the Stump in the background.

The South Square area, with the Stump in the background.

Objectors replied: “The council’s project is far too cramped, far too narrow, and far too near the centre of the town.”

Haven Bridge opened in 1966, John Adams Way 12 years later.

READ MORE: Timeline of building John Adams Way

The Odeon, later known as the Haven, can be seen in the background.

The Odeon, later known as the Haven, can be seen in the background.

Today, John Adams Way runs between the white building in the distance (what is now a Co-op Funeral Home) and the property in the foreground, where the ornamental object on top of the plinth appears to have been retained, but with a shorter wall.

Today, John Adams Way runs between the white building in the distance (what is now a Co-op Funeral Home) and the property in the foreground, where the ornamental object on top of the plinth appears to have been retained, but with a shorter wall.

The Haven Bridge end of John Adams Way as it is today. Picture: Google Streetview

The Haven Bridge end of John Adams Way as it is today. Picture: Google Streetview