NOSTALGIA: Outcry over arcade plans for old Boots store in 1969 and Songs of Praise countdown in 1999

The hard work of students at Pilgrim Hospital's diploma in nursing adult branch paid off when members secured a 100 per cent pass rate. All the students who graduated from the three-year course had gone to be staff nurses, with most staying in the area. Pictured are: Susan Cragg, Amy-Jane Gillham, Stacey Hackett, Karen Holland, Catherine McClymont, Jacquelline Meddick-Lord, Helen Richardson, Elaine Rogers, Nicola Rutt, Catherine Scott, Linda Shaw, Lucy Stephens, Michelle Williams, Christine Wilson, and nurse teacher Milika Maititi, and programme leader Liz Cotrel-Gibbons.
The hard work of students at Pilgrim Hospital's diploma in nursing adult branch paid off when members secured a 100 per cent pass rate. All the students who graduated from the three-year course had gone to be staff nurses, with most staying in the area. Pictured are: Susan Cragg, Amy-Jane Gillham, Stacey Hackett, Karen Holland, Catherine McClymont, Jacquelline Meddick-Lord, Helen Richardson, Elaine Rogers, Nicola Rutt, Catherine Scott, Linda Shaw, Lucy Stephens, Michelle Williams, Christine Wilson, and nurse teacher Milika Maititi, and programme leader Liz Cotrel-Gibbons.

This week (March 13 edition) in 1969 ...

* “Boston Town Council, by its decision to allow the former Boots premises in the Market Place (once the Municipal Buildings) to be used as a family amusement centre, is seeking to put temptation in the way of young people. Possible results would be more truancy, petty thieving, hooliganism, and general damage to mind and body.”

This was the latest accusation to be levelled at the council following a decision it had made two weeks earlier (as given in the Standard’s words).

It came in a letter from the presidents of the Boston and Holland County associations of the National Union of Teachers.

Another letter, from the Boston and District Business and Professional Women’s Club, declared: “The resultant noise will detract from the dignity of the Market Place.”

* Approval had been given for the award-winning Luis Buñuel film Belle de Jour to be shown at the Classic Cinema in Boston.

Such ‘X films’ at the time had to be vetted by Boston magistrates based on a synopsis supplied by the cinema manager.

A supporting feature – Chamber of Horrors, another X film – failed to meet with the approval, though.

This week in 1999 ...

* Hundreds of singers were being recruited for the recording of Songs of Praise in Boston later that month.

A BBC production team was busy singling out the local personalities who would be featured during the television broadcast.

However, a big congregation was needed to fill the Stump with sound – and people with experience of singing in choirs were especially in demand.

Two-hour long combined choir rehearsals were due to take place in the Centenary Methodist Church, in Red Lion Street, across two dates.

A television rehearsal at the Stump would then take place on a separate date, followed by the actual recording one day later on Wednesday, March 24, from 7.15-10.15pm.

Songs of Praise had been filmed in Boston before, some 22 years earlier.

This show would have a special significance for its conductor, Geoff Ellerby, 39, as he grew up in the town.

He used to live in Carlton Road, went to Boston Grammar School, and was at one time a trainee survey at Balderston’s.

However, when he was 25, he decided on a career change and won a place at the Royal College of Music.