NOSTALGIA: This week in 1983 and 1993

Boston Grammar School's Jazz Band in 1993 during a jazz workshop led by Ian Darrington (far left). The session was part of a prize won by the band in The Daily Telegraph Young Jazz 93 competition.
Boston Grammar School's Jazz Band in 1993 during a jazz workshop led by Ian Darrington (far left). The session was part of a prize won by the band in The Daily Telegraph Young Jazz 93 competition.
  • Luxurious £75 knickers selling fast in Boston in 1983
  • MP tackling food hygiene regulations in 1993

This week (May 2 edition) in 1983 ...

Shoppers in the market for a £75 pair of French lace-trimmed crepe de chine cami-knickers needed look no further than Boston.

If they are selling them, having made them in their own kitchen using wood – either a wooden spoon or wooden surface – then I am told that is illegal and they could be fined.

Hall’s, in Bridge Street, was one of only three shops in the country selling a range of top drawer undies by Charles Graham – the other two being in Knightsbridge and Newcastle.

Despite their high price tag, the items were proving much in-demand.

The shop had recently had an unexpected spot of free national advertising when the Daily Mirror featured a pair of the cami-knickers on its women’s page, with the names and addresses of the stockists.

* A Boston night nurse had hit out at a new set of what she called ‘petty rules’ for nurses at Pilgrim Hospital, which she claimed could worsen an already desperately low morale there.

The regulations included: not being allowed to address each other by first names, not being able to wear more than one badge (even though all nurses had two – the State Badge and the hospital badge), and having to stand when a superior, a sister or above, entered the room.

Hospital officials said there had been no issue of new rules, only a re-stating of professional codes of conduct for nurses.

This week in 1993 ...

* Boston MP Sir Richard Body was taking up the cause of business people who felt they had suffered injustices because of food hygiene regulations.

Sir Richard said there were as many as 3,500 regulations affecting not just commercial premises, but voluntary organisations too.

One example given was a ban on wood being used in the preparation of food – a regulation which also applied to people making cakes for sale at fetes and bazaars.

Sir Richard said: “If they are selling them, having made them in their own kitchen using wood – either a wooden spoon or wooden surface – then I am told that is illegal and they could be fined.”

The regulations had their origin in European Community directives, however as Sir Richard explained: “They (the directives) only lay down the minimum requirements, but our civil service in interpreting these directives have gone much further.”

* Boston Grammar School’s jazz band had been named a regional winner in the The Daily Telegraph’s prestigious Young Jazz 93 competition.

The 14-piece ensemble, run by English teacher Nick Fitton, triumphed in the Special Awards Category.