NOSTALGIA: This week in 1988 and 1993

Here is the scene at a monster-making workshop at Blackfriars Arts Centre this week 25 years ago. A group of seven to 10-year-olds created monsters out of such items as boxes and tissue paper.
Here is the scene at a monster-making workshop at Blackfriars Arts Centre this week 25 years ago. A group of seven to 10-year-olds created monsters out of such items as boxes and tissue paper.
  • MP gives backing to controversial Poll Tax in 1988
  • Family flee home after overturned tanker begins to leak gas in 1993

This week (April 18 edition) in 1988 ...

* The Government’s controversial Community Charge or Poll Tax had received the complete approval of Boston MP Sir Richard Body.

Potentially it could have been a very dangerous situation – the gas could have turned into a massive fireball.

Conservative backbenchers led by Michael Mates attempted to relate Poll Tax to people’s ability to pay in a one clause amendment to the Local Government Finance Bill, which would replace rates as a way of raising local government income.

However, Sir Richard voted against the amendment and in favour of the bill which was hastily amended to exempt a further one million people from the full payment as a concession to Tory rebels.

He said the overwhelming advantage of the Community Charge or Poll Tax (which would be replaced by council tax in 1993) was that it would encourage a more direct and positive interest in how local authorities spend money raised locally since more people would contribute.

* A Boston woman had been re-united with her purse, two years after it went missing.

Una Hardstaff received a letter from the Post Office saying it had been found on the public counter, still containing the four pound coins that were inside the purse when it was lost. She gave the £4 to charity.

This week in 1993 ...

* A family home had to be evacuated after propane gas began leaking from an overturned tanker.

The Calor tanker ended on its side after being in collision with a tractor and trailer in London Road, Frampton.

“Potentially it could have been a very dangerous situation – the gas could have turned into a massive fireball,” said the fire service’s Alan Broadbent.

* A controversial decision to turn over more Wyberton land to industry was expected to create jobs, but, it was feared, extra traffic chaos too.

Boston borough councillors had given the go-ahead to the plans for land between Slippery Gowt Lane and Marsh Lane.

They overturned the planning committee’s original decision to reject the scheme by 15 votes to 12.

* Plans to build a 10-pin bowling centre in Fishtoft had been approved, despite objections from scores of villagers who feared they would be badly affected by it.

Borough councillors voted 22 to 5 in favour of the scheme for Rochford Tower Lane.

As well as protests, members heard the project had attracted support, with 160-plus people signing a petition in support of it in one afternoon.