Police vow ‘Boston is a safe place’ as street drink ban is hailed as good for the town

Chief Supt Paula Wood with Chief Insp Paul Timmins at Boston Police Station
Chief Supt Paula Wood with Chief Insp Paul Timmins at Boston Police Station

Police chiefs in Boston insists the town is a ‘safe place to live and work’, with crime on the decline.

Police chiefs in Boston insists the town is a ‘safe place to live and work’, with crime on the decline.

The Standard met Chief Supt Paula Wood and Chief Insp Paul Timmins at Boston Police Station to quiz them on policing the town.

“The perception or fear of violence being perpertrated on somebody is very real here,” said Chief Insp Timmins.

“However, random attacks like those seen on television or in big cities certainly don’t happen in Boston.”

In the last three years the force says overall crime has reduced from 5,048 reports in 2012 to 4,678 in 2014.

“We have investigated nearly 15,000 crimes and officers work tirelessly to protect the public,” said Chief Insp Timmins.

“We would not be able to do this without their continued help and support. Boston does have its issues but it is a safe place to live and work. There is always going to be fluctuations in the level of criminality but it’s important we take every opportunity to prevent, investigate and detect crime.”

He added: “Our aim has always been to reduce crime, particularly violent crime and burglaries, and to ensure people feel safe. Street drinking and urinating in the street are also real concerns for the borough.”

On Monday, the town’s new street drinking ban came into force – and Chief Insp Timmins is confident officers will enforce it effectively.

“When we come across offenders we will deal with them,” he said.

The ban has been welcomed by politicians too.

Council leader Peter Bedford told The Standard: “It will mean you won’t see people drinking in the street anymore - or if they do, and refuse to hand it over to police or a PCSO in Boston, they could be hit with a £500 fine. So hopefully it should be the answer to a lot of the problems in Boston, in the Market Place and particularly Central Park and family areas like that.”

Conservative election candidate Matt Warman added: “I think banning street drinking in public is going to make a real difference to people in Boston.”

Labour’s Paul Kenny dismissed the launch as a ‘political stunt’ and vowed to fight cuts to the police and council with ‘grave concerns’ of the impact on Boston.

Compared to the same months of the previous year, crime is down in Boston this ‘police performance year’ – April 2014 to April 2015.