Cyclists raise £46k for charity in memory of Swineshead man

Celebrations at the end of the ride.
Celebrations at the end of the ride.

More than £46,000 has been raised for a cancer charity through a 300-mile, 24-hour cycling challenge held in memory of a Swineshead man.

The sum has been presented to The Brain Tumour Charity to support vital research into brain tumours following the epic fundraiser in June.

The late Dave Booth, of Swineshead.

The late Dave Booth, of Swineshead.

It saw more than 100 cyclists take to the roads around Boston to complete laps of a 20-mile circuit over 24 hours in memory of Dave Booth, a Swineshead man who lost his fight against a brain tumour in November 2016, aged just 51.

Their total was boosted by efforts of young members of the Boston Wheelers Cycling Club who covered the full 300 miles between them around the track at the PRSA Sports Arena on the same day.

After all of the funds were in, St James’s Place Wealth Management added a further 50 per cent to the total, meaning a phenomenal £46,892.46 was presented to The Brain Tumour Charity.

The business then matched this figure to award the same amount to the SJP Foundation, its charitable arm.

Cheque presentation with Paul Padden (left), of St Jamess Place, Vajiha Hameed (right), of The Brain Tumour Charity, and Daves family.

Cheque presentation with Paul Padden (left), of St Jamess Place, Vajiha Hameed (right), of The Brain Tumour Charity, and Daves family.

Among those taking part in the event, known as the Dave Booth Memorial Cycle Challenge, was Anthony Luto, of The Black Bull, Kirton. He said: “I have known Dave for more than 40 years and I was so proud to put on my cycling jersey to raise money in memory of my best friend. Dave was a larger-than-life character who would always be there at the end of the phone, and as a team we decided we wanted to give something back.”

Among the 300-mile team was Jack Holgate, who since the ride has gone from being the fiancé of Dave’s daughter, Jenni, to being her husband.

He said: “It was the hardest yet most rewarding challenge I have ever had to face, both physically and emotionally. At 4am on the Sunday morning, after having been cycling for 18 hours, remembering why we were taking part gave us the motivation, as a team to carry on.”

Geraldine Pipping, the Brain Tumour Charity’s head of fundraising, said: “We are grateful for all the efforts made by our incredible fundraisers and thank them for taking part in The Dave Booth Memorial Cycle Challenge – we hope they’re now enjoying a well-earned rest!

“Brain tumours are the biggest cancer killer of the under 40s and survival rates have not improved significantly over the last 40 years. We are leading the way in changing this by fighting brain tumours on all fronts.

“We receive no Government funding and rely 100 per cent on voluntary donations, so it’s only through the efforts of groups of people like this that we can change these shocking statistics in the future.”