NOSTALGIA: This week in 1968 and 1993

Haven High School pupils gather information in a CCTV survey in Boston in 1993.
Haven High School pupils gather information in a CCTV survey in Boston in 1993.
  • Debate in 1968 over whether shops should open on Good Friday
  • Plans for Boston bypass take ‘major step forward’ in 1993

This week (February 28 edition) in 1968 ...

* The question of opening and closing Boston’s shops at Easter was causing some controversy, The Standard reported.

The new footbridge for Rowley Road and Windsor Crescent in 1993. EMN-180221-161502001

The new footbridge for Rowley Road and Windsor Crescent in 1993. EMN-180221-161502001

“Rightly or wrongly, there is a small section of retail trade which would like to see the shops open on Good Friday and closed on Easter Monday and Tuesday,” it wrote.

The paper returned to the issue the following week, writing that the move to open on Good Friday had been started by Marks and Spencer.

Mr C. Adams, who had been manager there for the past year, had told traders he intended to open on Good Friday, closing on the following Tuesday in lieu.

He said: “From my experience in other areas I would say that people prefer shops open on a Friday and Saturday, and from a selfish point of view this would give the staff a longer break over Easter.”

Rightly or wrongly, there is a small section of retail trade which would like to see the shops open on Good Friday and closed on Easter Monday and Tuesday.

* Leaving England at the end of March to take up a job in Berne, Switzerland, was Boston’s Jane Snowden.

Jane, a civilian clerk at Boston Police Station, was to become a shorthand typist for the Omega watch firm.

The ex-Boston High School pupils who went on to study at the Lincoln Secretarial College said: “Fortunately it is possible to manage without French. Mine is a bit rusty.”

This week in 1993 ...

* Plans for Boston’s northern bypass took ‘a major step forward’ (as The Standard described it at the time), when Lincolnshire County councillors decided on the route they wanted.

They also agreed to push for Government funding on the so-called ‘south-west link’, a road which would join the new bypass from the Chain Bridge area to the A16 at Wyberton.

According to one of the leading supporters of the south-west link, Coun Jim Dodsworth, the road was vital for the economy of both Boston and ‘the whole Eastern seaboard’.

The route chosen for the northern bypass ran from the Chain Bridge area in a broad sweep to the north of the town, crossing the A16 north of Kelsey Bridge and onto the A52 north of Leverton.

A report to the meeting noted that 66 per cent of the local people who answered the questionnaire felt a northern bypass was necessary.

* The old footbridge linking Windsor Crescent and Rowley Road, in Boston, was replaced.

Spectators gathered as the new bridge was swung into position by a large crane.

The works, carried out by the county council, cost about £50,000.