Nurse causes a buzz by treating her tiniest patient - a bee

Veterinary nurse Donna administers some aid to the bee.
Veterinary nurse Donna administers some aid to the bee.

Staff at a Boston vets demonstrated an ‘un-bee-lievable’ act of kindness when they came to the aid of a bumblebee in distress yesterday.

Veterinary nurse Donna Chester-O’Neill spotted the insect struggling in hot sunshine outside Pilgrim Veterinary Surgery in Fydell Street and knew exactly how to help - offering the tiny patient a solution of sugar and water via a syringe.

The bumble bee recovered after having a drink of sugar water.

The bumble bee recovered after having a drink of sugar water.

But there was no sting in the ‘tale’ for this story - as the bee quickly recovered and buzzed off.

The act proved popular when the practice posted photos of it on Facebook - attracting nearly 200 likes in just a few hours.

“It was certainly the smallest patient I’ve ever treated,” laughed Donna. “It was so cute to see it drinking the solution - which I made from 2 spoons of sugar and one of water.”

Donna popped the bee in a cool shady spot before the creature eventually recovered and flew away to live another day.

The bee enjoyed a quick drink before buzzing off.

The bee enjoyed a quick drink before buzzing off.

The act of offering lethargic bees a sugar-water drink has become a popular trend among nature-loving Brits. With the growing awareness of the global bee decline, and the catastrophic effect it could have on worldwide food supplies, many are now doing their little bit to help and posting the ‘rescues’ on social media.

Campaign group Friends of the Earth warn that some species of bee face extinction due to threats from habitat loss and pesticides, among other things.

Bees are vital in the food chain, pollunating crops which would otherwise fail. Honey bees and other pollunators like bumblebees, butterflies and moths, are responsible for pollunating a third of the world’s food.