Rose’s advice for a long life – keep breathing

Rose Whitaker, of Elmwood House Nursing Home, Boston, celebrating her 100th birthday.  Pictured (front from left) Simon Sharp - grandson, Rose Whitaker, Jerome Sharp - grandson. (back from left) Susan Sharp - daughter-in-law, Duane Sharp - grandson, Andrew Sharp - son, Richard Sharp - son, Sheila Sharp - daughter-in-law, Darren Sharp - grandson, and Melanie Sharp - grand daughter.
Rose Whitaker, of Elmwood House Nursing Home, Boston, celebrating her 100th birthday. Pictured (front from left) Simon Sharp - grandson, Rose Whitaker, Jerome Sharp - grandson. (back from left) Susan Sharp - daughter-in-law, Duane Sharp - grandson, Andrew Sharp - son, Richard Sharp - son, Sheila Sharp - daughter-in-law, Darren Sharp - grandson, and Melanie Sharp - grand daughter.

‘Keep breathing’ and ‘have a sense of humour’ have been given as tips for a long life by a Boston woman who has reached her 100th birthday.

Rose Whitaker celebrated the milestone last Saturday, being joined by family at Elmwood House Nursing Home, in Sleaford Road, Boston, where she is resident, to mark the occasion.

Rose, a mother to two, grandmother to five and great-grandmother to 10, was born on January 30, 1918.

When asked how it felt to be 100, she said, jokingly, ‘ancient’, before adding: “I don’t feel any different to when I was 18.”

Apart from a break between 1943 and 1955 when she had her children Richard and Andrew, Boston-born Rose worked as a teacher from January 1941 to the end of August 1971.

She taught at St Mary’s School, Boston, Kirton Primary School, Park School, Butterwick Boys, Church End School, Old Leake, and Wrange Primary School.

“Her pedal cycle certainly saw many miles in all weathers but it was necessary in those days to make an effort,” said son Richard.

In 1963 she became happily married to Charles Whitaker, the well known local artist, until he passed away.

For many years she was active in the Townswomen’s Guild and the Boston High School Old Girls Association and enjoyed doing crosswords.

Last week, when asked by The Standard what was the secret to a long life, Rose joked: “Keep breathing.”

However, she would also suggest a sense of humour was important – not in terms of telling jokes, but being able to find the comedy in life.

“If there is a funny side, see it,” she said.

She added: “I’m quite sure what you put into life is what you get out. If you give it, then you will receive some of it.”