Here is our Top 20 list of the most important Oak Island discoveries to date.

The Top 20 Oak Island discoveries helping to unravel the 200 year-old mystery

Here we list the top 20 discoveries made to date which provide clues that may help to solve the Oak Island mystery. If viewing on a desktop: hover over each photo for the full description.

For over 200 years, people have been searching for treasure on Oak Island, centering around a mysterious 230ft-deep booby-trapped shaft known as the ‘money pit’. This floods when excavations reach a certain depth. Situated off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, the island and its long-held secret are now the subject of a popular History Channel show The Curse of Oak Island. Several important artefacts have been unearthed during the six seasons of the show - both on and off the island. A number of these were discovered by Lincolnshire metal detection expert Gary Drayton. Join us as we look back through the years, decades and centuries to uncover the 20 most significant finds to date - which may just help to solve the mystery once and for all.

Members of the Laginas team visited Domme Castle in France where they were shown a carving in a dungeon where many Templars were imprisoned in the early 1300s. Images of figures on the cross bear a striking resemblance to the lead cross found on Oak Island.

5. Templar Prison Carving

Members of the Laginas team visited Domme Castle in France where they were shown a carving in a dungeon where many Templars were imprisoned in the early 1300s. Images of figures on the cross bear a striking resemblance to the lead cross found on Oak Island.
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An old drawing of an alleged 1347 map presented on the show by the late researcher Zena Halpern. The map depicts Oak Island and writings in 'old French' - a type of slang used between the 8th and 14th centuries. Some of the points of the map have been translated to read 'the hatch', 'the valve' and 'the vault in the base of the earth'. Interestingly, one pointing to the money pit area is said to read 'the oak, enter here'.

6. 14th Century French Map

An old drawing of an alleged 1347 map presented on the show by the late researcher Zena Halpern. The map depicts Oak Island and writings in 'old French' - a type of slang used between the 8th and 14th centuries. Some of the points of the map have been translated to read 'the hatch', 'the valve' and 'the vault in the base of the earth'. Interestingly, one pointing to the money pit area is said to read 'the oak, enter here'.
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The stone was discovered at the island's Joudrey's Cove by locals some time ago. Noticing strange carvings on it, they blew it up, believing the treasure lay buried beneath. Treasure hunter Gilbert Hedden recovered fragments of it in 1936, one of which had Rune symbols similar to the letters 'H+O'. It is not known what the original carving said when the huge rock was in one piece.

7. The 'HO' Stone

The stone was discovered at the island's Joudrey's Cove by locals some time ago. Noticing strange carvings on it, they blew it up, believing the treasure lay buried beneath. Treasure hunter Gilbert Hedden recovered fragments of it in 1936, one of which had Rune symbols similar to the letters 'H+O'. It is not known what the original carving said when the huge rock was in one piece.
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Unearthed by metal detection expert Gary Drayton along the island's south-west shore, the object, a tip of a spear, has been identified as Roman by an antiquities expert who says it could be as much as 2,000 years-old.

8. Roman Pilum

Unearthed by metal detection expert Gary Drayton along the island's south-west shore, the object, a tip of a spear, has been identified as Roman by an antiquities expert who says it could be as much as 2,000 years-old.
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