Arts project is an open book in South Holland and Boston

Performers from Assault Events stage their specially-commisioned music and dance show at Elsoms Seeds, Spalding, part of Transported's arts project.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Performers from Assault Events stage their specially-commisioned music and dance show at Elsoms Seeds, Spalding, part of Transported's arts project. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Arts workshops, open-air theatres and lorries carrying portraits of South Holland are three of the things in store for the next phase of an arts project.

More than 36,000 people have been involved in shows and workshops hosted by Transported Arts between September 2013 and February 2013.

Now the project aiming to see more people living in South Holland and Boston take up artistic and creative activities is finalising its calendar of events for the rest of the year.

Dennis Bell, chairman of Transported’s management group, said: “The project was funded for three years by Arts Council England and this is the final year of a programme that has evolved and moved on with events that stand the best chance of being sustained.

“We’ve simplified the project and narrowed it down to seven strands, cutting back on the administration required by Transported.

“As far as we know, the funding will finish in December and before then, we’ll be looking at more and more things that we can keep self-sustaining so they can keep going and bring benefit to the population.”

Katie Baxter, agricultural administrator at Elsoms Seeds, Spalding.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Katie Baxter, agricultural administrator at Elsoms Seeds, Spalding. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Two of the strands are Open Book, where arts events and workshops are staged in libraries across South Holland and Boston, and Public Art which sees artists and designers transforming open spaces nominated by the public into areas of pride.

Liz Kelleher, head of art at Spalding High School and involved in the Spalding Public Arts Trails project, said: “For a large section of the area, art is still not part of the culture.

“With so many youth here, Transported is about finding opportunities to keep the momentum going so the area can become more of a cultural place and art becomes part of people’s lives.

“As an educator, it really is important for my students to have their own lines of enquiry across all the arts and to practice it where they live.

Transported is about finding opportunities to keep the momentum going so the area can become more of a cultural place and art becomes part of people’s lives.

Liz Kelleher, Spalding High School head of art

“It’s such an encouragement for them to have things to participate in and different events to get involved in.

“They are the next generation and the ones who need to be impacted in a big way.”

Another strand, Transported Live, has taken the project taken to workplaces such as Elsoms Seeds, Spalding, where a specially-commisioned dance and music performance took place last September.

Katie Baxter, agricultural administrator at Elsoms Seeds, said: “We were really lucky that Transported came to our workplace and were able to get involved in the project during working hours.

“It has left members of staff more open-minded to get involved in things like this and we’ve got plans to do another project with Transported that staff can actually enjoy.”